Andy Dick Off the Hook in Genital Attack Case

Comedy-show patron who claimed that Andy Dick rubbed his namesake on his face drops his claim

Here's a refreshing change of pace — Andy Dick isn't in legal trouble over alleged sexual misconduct.

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A lawsuit against former "NewsRadio" star filed by a concert patron who claimed that Dick rubbed his bare genitals on his face has been dismissed, according to court papers filed in U.S. District Court in Dallas County, Texas, on Tuesday.

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According to the papers, the patron, Robert Tucker, has dismissed his claims against Dick with prejudice against re-filing.

Tucker initially filed suit in May 20, claiming that he had attended a December 2010 performance by Dick at Trees performance venue in Dallas as part of the "Stocking Stuffer Comedy Tour."

Tucker alleged that, when he asked Dick for an autograph, the comedian — clad in a "red skirt, black top and a wig" — gave him something else altogether.

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According to the suit, Dick "took control of Plaintiff's head with his left hand and pulled down his costume skirt with right hand, exposing the fact that he was not wearing underwear beneath the skirt. Defendant Dick then, while still controlling Plaintiff's head with his hand, forced his genitals against the left side of Plaintiff's face."

Hopefully, that's not a move that Dick will be pulling during his current stint on "Dancing With the Stars."

"Plaintiff immediately pulled away," the suit notes.

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While Tucker made a physical escape, his suit claimed that he suffered "severe and long-lasting emotional distress," and that he was "harassed and ridiculed by the workers he supervises as well as his management peers."

The suit alleged offensive physical contact, intentional infliction of emotional distress and defamation by conduct by Dick. Tucker's claim also named United Talent Agency and the venue, because "UTA and Trees knew or should have known that Andy Dick was becoming increasingly disruptive during his performances, as he would occasionally assault customers, guests and even fellow performers without provocation."

Tucker had been seeking damages for past and future mental anguish, injury to character or reputation in the past and future and defamation, as well as exemplary damages.

Dick's company, Pollywog Entertainment, and the attorney for Trees in this case have not yet responded to TheWrap's request for comment.

Pamela Chelin contributed to this report.