Actually, Gov. Sanford Was Meeting … Aliens!

South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford was considered a strong contender for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination until alarm over his six day disappearance spread across the nation, culminating in a tear-stained press conference that revealed he had been neither hiking nor writing nor driving aimlessly around Buenos Aires but crying with the (other) woman he […]

South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford was considered a strong contender for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination until alarm over his six day disappearance spread across the nation, culminating in a tear-stained press conference that revealed he had been neither hiking nor writing nor driving aimlessly around Buenos Aires but crying with the (other) woman he loved.
 
Sanford bared his soul, apologizing to his family, his staff and most of the free world for his lies and obfuscations. He resigned as head of the Republican Governor's Association. His wife Jenny agreed to give him another chance, “if he continues to work toward reconciliation with a true spirit of humility and repentance.”
 
Even working his way back to presidential nominee would not be unheard of, over time. While some will be slow to forgive, at least, in the end, he told the truth.
 
Or … did … he?
 
A mysterious disappearance is easily accepted as a coverup for an affair; what politician would admit to such a breach of confidence if it were not true? Yet there are possible reasons behind a sudden loss of contact more shocking still — as those who remember the unexplained disappearance of a man already living in the White House — in 1954 — can attest.
 
Although he never admitted it publicly, President Dwight D. Eisenhower spent the late night and early morning of Feb. 20 and 21 meeting with space aliens at Edwards Air Force Base, averting a takeover of the planet.

 

We cannot afford to dismiss the possibility that a future president, Sanford, has been given the same difficult task, possibly because the aliens do not trust the progressives currently in office.
 
According to numerous accounts, including British ufology magazine Magonia, Eisenhower was vacationing in Palm Springs when he was flown to Edwards late Saturday night for the meeting. The press covering his trip noticed he was missing, and the Associated Press issued a statement that he had died, which their reporter immediately retracted. 

 

The next morning Ike attended a local church, and a spokesperson explained that the president had gone to a dentist “after chipping a cap on a tooth while eating a chicken wing at dinner.”
 
Such a scenario is potentially more calamitous than anything Sanford’s “confession” portends, yet who can say whether Earth would exist today if Eisenhower had not risked everything to vanish, supposedly without reason?
 
In April 1954, Gerald Light, described by UFOEvidence.org as “an elderly mystic,” wrote a letter stating that he, too, had traveled to Edwards (which he called Muroc, its former name) and had seen alien spacecraft there. Aware of the Eisenhower visit, he wrote, “From what I could gather, an official statement to the country is being prepared for delivery about the middle of May.”
 
Eisenhower never delivered that statement, and, to this day, our government has not told us about the former general’s greatest contribution to his country — or about threats of extinction we still face from galaxies unknown.
 
That is good enough reason to take Sanford’s atonement at face value, or let it appear as though we do. For the sake of the planet, perhaps the entire Milky Way, we must drop the matter now and face the future with courage.