Felicity Jones in Negotiations to Star in ‘Rosaline,’ a Revisionist Take on ‘Romeo & Juliet’

Felicity Jones in Negotiations to Star in 'Rosaline,' a Revisionist Take on 'Romeo & Juliet'

Universal's comedy will be a period film, though it will feature contemporary language

Fresh off a well-reviewed turn opposite Ralph Fiennes in “The Invisible Woman,” Felicity Jones has entered negotiations to star in “Rosaline” for Universal Pictures, TheWrap has learned.

A revisionist, comedic take on William Shakespeare’s classic “Romeo & Juliet” as told from Rosaline's point of view, the project is based on Rebecca Serle’s 2012 novel “When You Were Mine.”

Established theater director Alex Timbers (“Peter and the Starcatcher”) will direct “Rosaline,” which will be a period film set, though it will feature contemporary language. Jones is making a deal to play the title character.

Also Read: TheWrap Screening Series: Felicity Jones on Why She Gave Ralph Fiennes the Dickens Over ‘Invisible Woman’ (Video)

The current draft of the screenplay was written by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, who previously teamed on “The Spectacular Now” and “(500) Days of Summer.”

Shawn Levy will produce and Billy Rosenberg will executive produce, while Dan Cohen will co-produce.

Universal’s VP of production Maradith Frenkel and creative executive Chloe Yellin will oversee the project for the studio.

Also Read: HBO's ‘Girls’ Adds ‘Spider Man 2's’ Felicity Jones

Jones will soon be seen alongside Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone in “The Amazing Spider-Man 2, as well the true crime drama “True Story,” which stars Jonah Hill and James Franco. Jones recently wrapped the role of Stephen Hawking’s wife, Jane, in James Marsh’s drama “The Theory of Everything.” She next stars opposite Guy Pearce in Drake Doremus’ indie movie “Breathe In.”

The British actress, who broke out in Doremus’ romantic drama “Like Crazy,” is represented by WME, Independent Talent Group and attorney Jodi Peikoff.

  • hupto

    So in other words, it'll be like every other period film aimed at people under 35 who can't understand idioms other than their own.