Journalism’s Death Rattle

A sad and touching post by Nancy Cleeland, a labor reporter and colleague I’ve never met, who explains on HuffPost why she’s taking a buy-out and leaving the Los Angeles Times. She writes: "It’s awkward to criticize an old friend, which I still consider the Times to be, but I think the question of how […]

A sad and touching post by Nancy Cleeland, a labor reporter and colleague I’ve never met, who explains on HuffPost why she’s taking a buy-out and leaving the Los Angeles Times. She writes: "It’s awkward to criticize an old friend, which I still consider the Times to be, but I think the question of how mainstream journalists deal with the working class is important and deserves debate. There may be no better setting in which to examine the issue: The Los Angeles region is defined by gaping income disparities and an enormous pool of low-wage immigrant workers, many of whom are pulled north by lousy, unstable jobs. It’s also home to one of the most active and creative labor federations in the country. But you wouldn’t know any of that from reading a typical issue of the L.A. Times, in print or online. Increasingly anti-union in its editorial policy, and celebrity — and crime-focused in its news coverage, it ignores the economic discontent that is clearly reflected in ethnic publications such as La Opinion." Here’s the whole thing.