Katie Couric Invites Obama, Romney and Palin to New Show

She'd also like a date with George Clooney

Katie Couric, host of ABC's upcoming talk show "Katie," says she'd like Sarah Palin to appear on the new show. And a date with George Clooney.

Getty ImagesShe may have a better shot with Clooney.

Asked about her upcoming guests for the series, which premieres Sept. 10, Couric said she has reached out to both President Obama and Mitt Romney, as well as Palin.

Also read: Sarah Palin on Colo. Shootings: 'Bad Guys Don't Follow Laws'

"I have invited both candidates and their wives and anyone else in their family they'd like to bring," she said. "And yes, I have invited Sarah Palin to come on the show as well."

She hasn't gotten any response so far. Palin, the former Alaska governor and vice presidential candidate, famously stumbled in a 2008 interview with Couric. She noted Alaska's proximity to Russia as she described her foreign policy experience, and failed to name the news sources she read regularly.

Not that Palin has been a shut-in since then: She's served as a Fox News commentator and even spoke to your humble correspondent earlier this week.

Couric spoke about her future plans and hopes at the Television Critics Association summer press tour, where she proved herself one of the wittier panelists so far. The press room is typically subdued, and she walked onstage with the line, "thank you for that scattered applause."

She mentioned the date with Clooney when asked what else she wants to do in her life. She didn't sound interested in taking a spot on ABC's "Good Morning America," noting her 15 years on NBC's "Today."

But Couric will be among the personalities who will help fill in when "GMA" co-anchor Robin Roberts goes on medical leave from the show to undergo a bone marrow transplant. Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, and Walters' fellow "The View" panelists are also expected to fill in.

She also said she'd like to see the eventual publication of a children's book she wrote about  dealing with grief. She wrote it after losing her husband, Jay Monahan, to colon cancer in 1998, when they had two young daughters.

"It was really a book that was designed to help… grieving families," she said. "I tried to get it published but people felt it was too depressing. But I really do think there's a need to help families and neighbors and communities understand what families are going through when someone is diagnosed with a terminal illness and how best to help those children and family members. … When Jay died I didn't really feel that there was anything to help people understand how to help us as a family."