CBS Brings Back ‘Person to Person’ with Charlie Rose, Lara Logan

Made famous by Edward R. Murrow, the interview show dates back to the 1950s

CBS News is reviving interview series “Person to Person,” made famous by legendary broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow in the '50s.

Co-hosted by new morning host Charlie Rose and chief foreign correspondent Lara Logan, the reboot will begin Feb. 8 at 8 p.m.

“We have dreamed about bringing a modern version of this great program, ‘Person to Person’ back to CBS for years – and now it is happening,” Jeff Fager,  CBS News Chairman, said in a statement. “It is an exciting new development for us, particularly because it will be led by two of our most accomplished producers and two of our best interviewers.”

The producers are Susan Zrinisky, executive producer of “48 Hours Mystery” and special projects, and Judy Tygard, senior producer of “48 Hours” and special projects.

Also Read: CBS Adds Charlie Rose, Gayle King in Morning Show Reshuffle

On the original show, which begain on CBS in 1953, Murrow sat in a studio, alongside a large screen on which everyone from Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor to Fidel Castro appeared from their own homes, seated comfortably in their own living rooms and giving tours of their property — a format Barbara Walters later would borrow freely from. 

The chats were informal, verging more on the personal than the political — in stark contrast to Murrow's other CBS show, "See It Now." It often was criticized for its lack of depth, but remained extremely popular.

In 1959, Murrow was replaced by Charles Collingwood.

The release states that the new show "will retain many of the elements that made the original so captivating. Co-hosts Rose and Logan will bring viewers into the private homes of public people – musical artists, actors, directors, political leaders and newsmakers."

This means not one but two major networks have put another news show in primetime, the other being NBC’s experiment with newsmagazine “Rock Center.” The ratings for "Rock Center" remain low despite high-profile stories like the first interview with Jerry Sandusky and the addition of Chelsea Clinton.

Can CBS recapture the old magic?