Conrad Murray Denied Bail During Michael Jackson Death Appeal

Judge cites documentary during which Conrad Murray espoused home use of propofol as reason for keeping him behind bars

Conrad Murray, Michael Jackson's former personal physician, will remain behind bars while he appeals his involuntary manslaughter conviction in the death of Michael Jackson, the Associated Press reports.

Also read: Conrad Murray Wants His Freedom — and Still Blames Michael Jackson for Death

During a bail hearing at Los Angeles Superior Court on Friday, Judge Michael Pastor shot down Murray's request for freedom, citing a documentary during which Murray asserted that the anesthetic propofol was safe to administer in a home setting.

Murray's attorney has not yet responded to TheWrap's request for comment.

Murray was found guilty in November 2011 after a jury found him responsible for Jackson's 2009 death at the age of 50. In a police interview aired in court during his trial, Murray admitted to giving Jackson propofol on an almost nightly basis in the months leading up to his death. The Los Angeles County Coroner's Office determined that Jackson died of acute propofol intoxication.

Also read: Conrad Murray Says Michael Jackson Was a Bedwetter in MSNBC Documentary (Video)

In court papers filed earlier this week, Murray's defense team argued that Murray should be set free for a number of reasons, including that Murray is not a flight risk and doesn't pose a danger to the community. The filing also argued that Murray's appeal will "raise a substantial legal question" that, if decided in Murray's favor, could lead to his conviction being overturned.

Among the issues that will likely be raised in Murray's appeal, the filing said, is that Jackson may have been responsible for his own death, due to the stress created by his dire financial situation.

"Jackson was in debt approximately $440 million and desperately needed to fulfill a contractual commitment at the O2 arena in London. He was on the verge of losing his entire estate to foreclosure," the filing reads. "The pressure to fight through his insomnia, to rehearse and be the entertainer he was in his earlier years was overwhelming. His motivation and resulting desperation were relevant to show a likelihood or reason to act in a manner inconsistent with good judgment."

Murray is currently serving a four-year sentence for Jackson's death in the Los Angeles County Jail. He was initially sentenced to four years in prison, but a change in sentencing guidelines placed him in jail.