Gmail Outage Creates Hiccup, but Google Says It's Resolved (Updated)

Gmail Outage Creates Hiccup, but Google Says It's Resolved (Updated)

Gmail outage sends users scrambling — “Add me on Facebook,” suggests Justin Bieber in a tweet

Google says it has fixed the Gmail problems that left many users nationwide without service Tuesday morning.

"The problem with Google Mail should be resolved," the company said on its App Status Dashboard. "We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience and continued support. Please rest assured that system reliability is a top priority at Google, and we are making continuous improvements to make our systems better."

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It appeared that the problems began early Tuesday, but it remains unclear how widespread the interruptions were, as not all users experienced problems. 

Google's App Status Dashboard, which monitors and issues updates on the system, indicated early Tuesday that there were intermittent outages, but gave no indication of what caused the problem or when service might be restored.

By 10:45 a.m. PT, some users in Los Angeles who had experienced difficulties had their service restored. 

Gmail-happy Hollywood was predictably unsettled by the outages and some took to Twitter. Even Justin Bieber tweeted "My Gmail is down. Add me on Facebook. Smiles." 

Even Google took to Twitter, with what seemed to be positive news, tweeting at 10:31 a.m. PT: "#Gmail should be back for some of you already, and will be back for everyone soon. Thanks for your patience."

Earlier Google's Gmail blog, engineering director David Besbris described the problem as a “minor issue” but provided no clues as to what caused the outage. “We’re terribly sorry for the inconvenience and will get Gmail back up and running as soon as possible,” he said.

Google engineers faced some hurdles fixing the problem. Many of their employees use Gmail, too.

This outage appeared to be less widespread than a Gmail interruption in February, when the service was completely down for more than two hours.