Stranger in a Strange Google Land

About 650,000 people have watched me interview athletes on YouTube since Aug. 9. Is that a high number of people? A low number of people? No idea.   The interviews are produced by BermanBraun which has a deal with Google who, unbeknownst to me, bought YouTube. There were lots of preliminary meetings and conference calls […]

About 650,000 people have watched me interview athletes on YouTube since Aug. 9. Is that a high number of people? A low number of people? No idea.
 
The interviews are produced by BermanBraun which has a deal with Google who, unbeknownst to me, bought YouTube. There were lots of preliminary meetings and conference calls during which I was like a U.N. delegate without an interpreter.
 
Some verbs used as nouns sounded familiar, like "hits" and "views." Some nouns were renovated into verbs, like "monetize." It was difficult to put any of it into context, but I kind of got this berserk idea that people were trying to make a profit on the project.
 
Is anyone making money on this project? No idea.
 
At one meeting, the body language of certain people seemed to indicate that Google was trying to find a sponsor for the "channel," which may or may not exist on a "platform" on which there's a "gadget."
 
When Google — a concern that seems to have the power to make others stand and take notice — signed on Palm Pre as sponsor, the meetings surged in attendance. Just the taking of attendance on the conference calls took 15 minutes. "Is Palm here? BermanBraun? Google? YouTube? JoyStick? Modernista? Double Click?"
 
All the people from all the companies sounded oppressively competent. What do they all do?
 
No idea.
 
Like Woody Allen saying that he never noticed that his Freudian therapist had died, no one noticed when I stopped attending meetings.
 
I just wanted to ask Kobe Bryant how much he tips the referees.