William Shatner’s Alleged Love Child Files $170 Million Lawsuit Against ‘Star Trek’ Icon

Peter Sloan claims that actor’s denial of paternity has damaged his career

The man who purports to be William Shatner‘s son has a message for the “Star Trek” icon: Let me call you daddy. And crack open your wallet while you’re at it.

Shatner is being sued by a man who claims that the actor is his father, and wants the man who played James T. Kirk to take a DNA test to prove his paternity.

Oh, he also wants $170 million from Shatner, the New York Post reports.

In the lawsuit, filed by Peter Sloan, aka Peter Shatner, claims that Shatner had a fling with his mother, the late actress Kathy McNeil, resulting in Sloan/Shatner’s conception.

Sloan, a radio host, claims that he met Shatner in 1984 on the set of Shatner’s series “T.J. Hooker,” and that Shatner admitted at the time that he was Sloan’s father. Some of this information is available at McNeil’s IMDb page.

The lawsuit — filed in circuit court in Florida — claims that since 1984, Shatner has denied being Sloan’s father. The lawsuit also asserts that, after Sloan registered the domain PeterShatner.com and began broadcasting on a radio show using the stage name Peter Shatner, the actor’s lawyer  told him that Shatner “confirmed to me once again that he is not your father.”

Sloan says that Shatner’s team managed to get Sloan’s Twitter account shut down. and that Shatner’s social-media director “posted malicious, libelous and slanderous statements about the Plaintiff on Facebook and Twitter.”

Sloan claims that the defendants’ actions have led to the loss of the production of his film “TC Therapeutic Community,” as well as loss of income from the use of the name Peter Shatner.

A spokeswoman for Shatner has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Alleging libel, defamation, tortious interference and slander, Sloan is asking for Shatner to stop denying that he is Sloan’s father, and for Shatner to take a DNA test “to confirm paternity.”

He’s asking for $30 million in compensatory damages, punitive damages of $90 million and $50 million for pain and suffering.