Women in Hollywood

I’m already getting lots of mail from readers in Hollywood and elsewhere, weighing in today’s story on the dearth of women executives at the top of the moviemaking power structure, and its effect on the movies. To me, the most remarkable fact I learned in reporting this piece is that only 15 percent of those […]

300 I’m already getting lots of mail from readers in Hollywood and elsewhere, weighing in today’s story on the dearth of women executives at the top of the moviemaking power structure, and its effect on the movies. To me, the most remarkable fact I learned in reporting this piece is that only 15 percent of those involved in producing and making movies (meaning, the creative side), are women. That is a stunningly low number, in my view. Here’s a bit of today’s story, and a link to the rest: "While Hollywood has not stopped making films appealing to women and girls, as evidenced by recent and coming releases like "Music and Lyrics," "Nancy Drew," and "The Nanny Diaries," women here worry that the future will not be so bright. They are nervous about the disappearance of many of the movie world’s most visible female power brokers and concerned that a box office dominated by seemingly male-oriented action films like "300" means less attention for movies that have obvious appeal to female audiences, 51 percent of moviegoers.

“I feel that it’s a different time; it’s not the time that it was,” said Lynda Obst, the producer of "Hope Floats" and "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days," who said she recently had to fight to keep Disney from canceling one of her productions, a remake of "Adventures in Babysitting." (continued….)