Cyndi Lauper Doesn’t Think Madonna’s Women’s March Speech ‘Served Our Purpose’ (Video)

“Anger is not better than clarity and humanity,” says ’80s pop star

Reaction to Madonna‘s profanity-laden Women’s March speech has largely fallen along party lines. Anti-Trump liberals loved the speech for openly going after those who scoffed at the March and its concerns with a “f*** you,” while Donald Trump’s supporters lambasted her for saying she was “ashamed to be an American” and admitting that she at one point had thoughts about “bombing the White House.”

But Madonna‘s latest critic is a celebrity who also took part in the Women’s March. On an episode of “Watch What Happens Live,” host Andy Cohen asked pop star Cyndi Lauper what she thought of Madonna‘s speech. Lauper said that while she understood that Madonna was “jacked up on emotions,” she didn’t think the speech “served our purpose.”

“Anger is not better than clarity and humanity,” Lauper explained. “That is what opens people’s minds. When you want to change people’s mind, you have to share your real story.”

So which celebrity did Lauper think gave a good speech? That would be Scarlet Johansson, whom Lauper praised for being “clear” and “eloquent.” At the March, Johansson told the estimated 500,000 in attendance about her visit to a Planned Parenthood clinic as a teenager and how it gave her essential healthcare guidance. Defunding Planned Parenthood has been a long-time goal of the GOP, as they are opposed to the clinic’s abortion policies.

“For the more than 2.5 million patients a year that rely on Planned Parenthood services for cancer and STD screenings, birth control, safe abortion and pregnancy planning these are uncertain and anxious times,” Johannson said. “Lawmakers in 24 states have tried to block patients from receiving care at Planned Parenthood. Congress has voted to limit reproductive services 9 times. There are very real and devastating consequences to limiting access to what should be considered basic health care.”

Lauper praised Johansson for bringing a personal element to a political issue that affects millions of women.

“Yelling just jacks people up,” she said. “It doesn’t communicate any kind of humanity or story that would open another person’s mind.”

Watch the clip above.