‘Furious 7’ Roars Past $1 Billion at Overseas Box Office, Joining ‘Avatar’ and ‘Titanic’

Universal’s hot car blockbuster passes “Frozen” and is now fifth on the all-time list globally

Last Updated: April 26, 2015 @ 11:43 AM

“Furious 7” crossed $1 billion at the international box office this weekend, making it the third film ever to achieve the milestone along with the James Cameron juggernauts “Avatar” and “Titanic.”

“Furious 7” also passed Disney’s “Frozen” to become the fifth-highest-grossing movie ever at the worldwide box office — which includes domestic and international receipts — with $1.32 billion, behind “Avatar” ($2.8 billion), “Titanic” ($2.2 billion) and “The Avengers” ($1.5 billion).

The 2009 sci-fi saga took in $2.02 billion at the international box office, the ship disaster epic brought in $1.52 billion from abroad in 1997 and the Marvel superhero mashup totaled $895 million from overseas.

With this weekend’s $69.7 million from overseas and $18.3 million from North America lifting its worldwide grosses to $1.32 billion, Universal’s “Furious 7” now trails only the two Cameron movies and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” ($1.34) as the top-earning films ever globally.

In China, “Furious 7” has raced to a stellar $323 million in 15 days — more than it’s made in North America — making it the highest-grossing film in history in that market. “Transformers: Age of Extinction” was the previous leader with $319 million.

The top grossing territories are the U.K. and Ireland ($51.7 million), Mexico $49.4 million, Brazil ($39.7 million); Germany ($35.2 million), Russia $31 million, Australia ($30.8 million) and France ($29.4 million).

The James Wan-directed action sequel, which stars Vin Diesel, Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriguez and the late Paul Walker, is the highest-grossing Universal film of all time.

Once in doubt, an eighth “Fast and Furious” movie has been set for 2017 and added to the franchise, which has grossed more than $3.6 billion since launching in 2001.

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