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Plácido Domingo ‘Engaged in Inappropriate Activity’ With Women, Opera Union Investigation Finds

”I respect that these women finally felt comfortable enough to speak out, and I want them to know that I am truly sorry for the hurt that I caused them,“ Domingo said in a statement

Renowned opera singer Plácido Domingo “engaged in inappropriate activity, ranging from flirtation to sexual advances, in and outside of the workplace,” according to the findings of an investigation led by the U.S. union of opera performers.

“The investigation concluded that Mr. Domingo had, in fact, engaged in inappropriate activity, ranging from flirtation to sexual advances, in and outside of the workplace,” the American Guild of Musical Artists — which represents opera, dance and choral performers — said in a statement on Tuesday. “Many of the witnesses expressed fear of retaliation in the industry as their reason for not coming forward sooner. The AGMA Board of Governors has accepted the findings of the report and will take appropriate action.”

The investigation was launched last September after the Associated Press reported accusations from over 20 women that the opera superstar had sexually harassed them, with the oldest accounts dating back to the late 1980s. While a representative for AGMA told TheWrap that the union “does not intend to publicly release the details of our internal investigation,” it will be “taking steps to address the systemic issues identified which allow harassment to occur and go unreported and unaddressed in the workplace.”

Domingo apologized for his behavior and said he took “full responsibility” for his actions.

“I have taken time over the last several months to reflect on the allegations that various colleagues of mine have made against me. I respect that these women finally felt comfortable enough to speak out, and I want them to know that I am truly sorry for the hurt that I caused them,” Domingo said in a statement Tuesday to the New York Times. “I accept full responsibility for my actions, and I have grown from this experience. I understand now that some women may have feared expressing themselves honestly because of a concern that their careers would be adversely affected if they did so. While that was never my intention, no one should ever be made to feel that way.”

The Los Angeles Opera, where Domingo had served as general director for more than 15 years before resigning last year, is still awaiting the result of its own independent investigation into the singer from the law firm Gibson Dunn. “LA Opera is in the process of receiving and considering the findings of the independent Gibson Dunn investigation. We expect to complete that process shortly and will have further comment at that time,” an L.A. Opera spokesperson said.