TheWrapbox-office – TheWrap https://www.thewrap.com Covering Hollywood Thu, 18 Jan 2018 07:56:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 ‘Coco’ Stays No. 1 as Box Office Takes a Holiday Breather https://www.thewrap.com/coco-stays-no-1-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/coco-stays-no-1-box-office/#respond Sun, 03 Dec 2017 16:12:22 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1748779 Until “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” arrives in two weeks, there will be no new wide releases at the box office as casual moviegoers are pulled away from theaters with the start of the holiday season. But while post-Thanksgiving weekend has historically been a slower one for movie theaters, there are still plenty of popular films now playing, foremost among them being Pixar’s “Coco.”

The animated film is estimated to make $26.1 million in its second weekend, a 46 percent drop from the $50.8 million it made from Fri.-Sun. on Thanksgiving weekend. “Coco” now has a domestic total of $108.7 and a global total of $280 million. In China, where “Coco” had the second-highest opening weekend for an animated film, the film’s message of the importance of family is resonating with moviegoers thousands of miles away from Mexico. The film is on pace to become the highest grossing Pixar/Disney Animation release in China, currently third on that list with $75.6 million after just 10 days in theaters.

Meanwhile, “Justice League” still won’t hit the $200 million domestic mark after its third weekend in theaters, with $16.5 million for this frame and a running total of $197.3 million. By comparison, “Fantastic Beasts,” which “Justice League” is 8 percent ahead of in box office totals, made $18.1 million in its third weekend, while “Batman v Superman” made $23.3 million and “Wonder Woman” made $41.2 million.

“Wonder” continues to punch above its weight class, as the $20 million family film expands to 3,450 theaters and brings in an estimated $12.5 million to push its total to $88 million. “Thor: Ragnarok” is approaching the $300 million mark with $9.7 million in its fifth weekend to push its total to $291.4 million, with a global total of $816 million. “Daddy’s Home 2” completes the top five with $7.5 million for a total of $82.8 million.

While there were no wide releases to give the box office another jolt, revenue is still up 8 percent year-to-year for the first weekend of December. This is thanks no only to the popular wide releases already in theaters, but also to the handful of Oscar contenders making their presence felt in limited release. Two more of those films entered the fray this weekend: A24’s “The Disaster Artist” and Fox Searchlight’s “The Shape of Water.”

“The Disaster Artist,” James Franco’s biopic about Tommy Wiseau and the making of his infamous film, “The Room,” opened in 19 theaters and grossed $1.2 million. With a per screen average of $64,254, it’s only the sixth film to post a PSA of over $60,000 from more than ten screens. “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo Del Toro’s sci-fi romance, opened on two screens in New York and grossed $166,800. For more on the indie box office, check our report here. 

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‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘Darkest Hour’ Keep Indie Box Office Roaring https://www.thewrap.com/call-me-by-your-name-darkest-hour-indie-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/call-me-by-your-name-darkest-hour-indie-box-office/#respond Sun, 26 Nov 2017 21:18:00 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1745544 With “Lady Bird” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” expanding nationwide, two more Oscar contenders, Sony Pictures Classics’ “Call Me by Your Name” and Focus Features’ “Darkest Hour” entered this weekend to huge limited release numbers.

“Call Me by Your Name” set a new per screen average record for the year from its four-screen LA/NY release, making just under $405,000 for a PSA of $101,219. That’s the highest PSA at the box office since the $176,000 average scored by “La La Land” in a five-screen release last year.

The coming-of-age LGBT film stars Timothee Chalamet as a teenage Italian-American who falls in love with his father’s student (Armie Hammer) during the summer of 1983. Based on the novel by Andre Aciman, the film is directed by Luca Guadagnino from a screenplay by James Ivory. The film has received critical acclaim with a 98 percent Rotten Tomatoes score.

“Darkest Hour” has also performed well in its four-screen start, grossing $248,000 for a PSA of $62,000. The Winston Churchill biopic stars Gary Oldman as the famed prime minister, along with Ben Mendelsohn, Kristin Scott Thomas and Lily James. Joe Wright directed from a screenplay by Anthony McCarten, and the film has a 86 percent RT score.

In wider release was Bleecker Street’s “The Man Who Invented Christmas,” making $1.3 million from 626 screens. Telling the story of Charles Dickens and how he came to write “A Christmas Carol,” the film stars Dan Stevens as the author with Christopher Plummer as Ebenezer Scrooge. The film has a 79 percent RT score.

Among holdovers, “Lady Bird” passed the $10 million mark after expanding nationwide to 791 screens and making $5.3 million over the five-day weekend. “Three Billboards” also did well in its third weekend, expanding to 590 screens and adding $5.8 million to bring its total to $7.6 million. Meanwhile, Good Deed’s “Loving Vincent” crossed the $5 million mark in its tenth weekend, making $263,000.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Call Me by Your Name' Film Review: Senses Working Overtime in Lush Summer Romance

'Get Out,' 'Call Me by Your Name,' 'Good Time' Top Indie Spirit Awards Nominations

Does 'Call Me By Your Name' Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Armie Hammer Totally Shuts Down James Woods for Dissing Gay Romance 'Call Me by Your Name'

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Thanksgiving Box Office Preview: Will ‘Coco’ Be Hurt by John Lasseter Accusations? https://www.thewrap.com/coco-thanksgiving-box-office-weekend-preview/ https://www.thewrap.com/coco-thanksgiving-box-office-weekend-preview/#respond Wed, 22 Nov 2017 00:37:36 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1744307 Thanksgiving weekend is shaping up to be a very interesting one at the box office for both good and bad reasons.

The biggest film — and the hottest news story — of the extended weekend will be Pixar’s critically-acclaimed “Coco,” which hits theaters right after studio founder John Lasseter took a leave of absence amid reports of sexual misconduct. Meanwhile, the underperforming “Justice League” will try to avoid a big drop, and “Wonder” will try to keep its surprising momentum going.

“Coco,” which has already become Mexico’s highest grossing film of all time with over $43 million grossed since its release on at the end of October, is projected to have a five-day opening of $55-60 million. By comparison, Pixar’s last Thanksgiving release, “The Good Dinosaur,” had a five-day start of $55.4 million in 2015 and a $123 million run, while Disney’s “Moana” had a five-day opening of $82 million last year en route to a $248.7 million domestic cume.

While audience hype for “Coco” hasn’t been very big, critics have been raving about the film’s emotional depth and commitment to its faithful depiction of Mexican culture, giving it a 95 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes. Analysts who spoke with TheWrap say they believe “Coco” will have a box office performance similar to “Zootopia,” a film that didn’t have much audience buzz prior to its release but had legs for several weeks thanks to stellar word of mouth.

But that word of mouth might be tainted by Tuesday’s news that Lasseter, who has been one of Disney’s biggest creative forces since directing “Toy Story” 22 years ago, admitted to “missteps” in an internal memo announcing his leave shortly before The Hollywood Reporter published a report outlining allegations of sexual misconduct. As on all Pixar films, Lasseter is credited in “Coco” as an executive producer.

Analysts say that its unlikely that the news will have an immediate box office impact on “Coco” this weekend, particularly among family audiences. But it’s still unknown how it will impact the conversation surrounding the film, as Lasseter is often credited for building Pixar’s reputation for high-quality animated films and has overseen Disney Animation as chief creative officer during its recent hot streak with films like “Frozen” and “Wreck-It Ralph.” Between them, Pixar and Lasseter-produced Disney films have won nine of the last ten Animated Feature Oscars.

“Coco” follows a 12-year-old boy named Miguel, whose yearning to escape his family’s ban on playing music leads him on a voyage to the Land of the Dead. The film stars Anthony Gonzalez, Gael Garcia Bernal, Benjamin Bratt, Renee Victor, and Alanna Ubach. Adrian Molina directed the film with Lee Unkrich (“Toy Story 3”) and co-wrote the script with Matthew Aldrich.

“Justice League” will enter Thanksgiving weekend trying to avoid the heavy second weekend drop-off suffered by “Batman v Superman.” That film had an opening of $166 million, the second highest of 2016 behind only “Captain America: Civil War” ($179.1 million). But after poor word of mouth spread from early audiences, second weekend totals dropped 69 percent to $51 million.

By comparison, second weekend totals for the much better received “Wonder Woman” were $58.5 million. That was just a 43 percent drop from its $103 million opening, and the film’s domestic total passed those of “Suicide Squad” and “BvS” after just four weeks. The extended weekend could mitigate the fall for the film, but other films like “Coco” and “Thor: Ragnarok” will be heavy competition.

Despite this, Warner Bros. is still on pace to pass the $1.9 billion it made domestically last year, but had “Justice League” performed like “Wonder Woman,” which it is unlikely to do now, 2017 totals for the studio could have beaten the $2.1 billion record set in 2009.

“Warner Bros. is situated to be as successful as Disney if they get their act together with DC,” said Exhibitor Relations analyst Jeff Bock. “And I think that’s the most frustrating thing if you’re a comic book fan because WB has such amazing capability to compete toe-to-toe with Marvel but they’re not doing it, consistently underperforming other than ‘Wonder Woman.’ Warner Bros., box office wise, should be by now step-to-step with Disney, and that’s the next threshold they need to get to.”

Finally, there’s “Wonder,” which performed above expectations with a $27.5 million opening last weekend against a $20 million budget. The adaptation of R.J. Palacio’s inspirational novel has received rave reviews from family and older female audiences, and with school kids who read the book as part of their curriculum on an extended break this weekend, the movie should have strong holdover numbers. Combine that with robust group sales from schools who are taking classes on field trips to see the film, and a domestic total of over a $100 million is now a very feasible goal for this low-budget release.

“‘Wonder’ is a wonderful and inspiring film that is going to be a must-see for lots of families this holiday season,” said comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian. “This film has all the makings of a 4x or even 5x multiple by the time all is said and done.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Coco' Film Review: Pixar's Journey Down Mexico Way Pays Colorful, Moving Tribute to Family

Pixar Head John Lasseter Takes 'Six-Month Sabbatical,' Apologizes for 'Missteps'

'Justice League' Star Jason Momoa 'Bummed' by Movie's Weak Reception

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Can ‘Star Wars’ and Superheroes Rescue the Box Office This Year? https://www.thewrap.com/can-star-wars-superheroes-rescue-box-office-year/ https://www.thewrap.com/can-star-wars-superheroes-rescue-box-office-year/#respond Thu, 02 Nov 2017 22:03:56 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1734492 This weekend, “Thor: Ragnarok” will arrive in theaters with expectations of a $100 million-plus opening at the box office. It comes not a moment too soon for movie theaters, which could use the boost after the worst October in ten years.

After “It” gave the 2017 box office the biggest September ever, comScore reported that total domestic revenue for October only reached $556.2 million, down 15 percent from last year and the first time October numbers have dipped below $600 million since 2007 ($520 million). It’s a step down that has been widely expected since “Blade Runner 2049” significantly underperformed, followed by a string of poorly received and niche releases. The running total for the year now stands at $8.74 billion, down 5.2 percent year-to-date from 2016.

That means that to pass last year’s $11.3 billion total, the last two months of 2017 will have to bring $2.63 billion, compared to $2.15 billion last year during that time frame. Analysts tell TheWrap that while the end-of-year blockbusters will bring in big bucks, they won’t save 2017 from a downtick.

“2017’s been a good example of the rollercoaster nature of the box office, with lots of ups and downs,” said comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian. “Unfortunately there’s just not enough time and movies to make up the ground lost during the summer.”

On lowball estimates, it’s safe to assume that November’s superhero films, “Thor” and “Justice League,” will gross at least $300 million, while Pixar’s “Coco” has a solid chance of matching the $248 million total made by Disney’s “Moana” last year. Then there’s “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” which is expected to gross more than $200 million in its opening just like its predecessor, “The Force Awakens.”

By the time 2015 came to an end, “The Force Awakens” had accumulated just under $652 million domestically, 69 percent of its $936.6 million total stateside gross. The following year, “Rogue One” made $408 million by year’s end, 76 percent of its $532.1 million total. Based on those figures, analysts estimate that “The Last Jedi” will make at least $500 million by year’s end.

This means that year’s remaining four blockbusters will likely gross at least $1.3 billion between them, halfway toward that $2.63 billion target. But it’s hard to find other films among the smaller offerings this holiday season that can provide the other half.

“I think ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ could bring in some money before the year is out, and there’s the usual batch of Oscar contenders like ‘Downsizing’ and ‘The Disaster Artist,’ but I don’t think we’re going to see another ‘La La Land’ from the Oscar crowd this year,” said Exhibitor Relations’ Jeff Bock.

Other releases this winter include Fox’s adaptation of “Murder on the Orient Express,” Fox Searchlight’s “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” and Sony’s “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Horror Movies Have Grossed Over $1 Billion at the Box Office in 2017

'Thor: Ragnarok' Could Help Marvel Studios Make Box Office History

Deadpool Comic Creator Says Movie Sequel Will Clobber Han Solo Movie at the Box Office

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31 Movies That Have Grossed $1 Billion Worldwide (Photos) https://www.thewrap.com/movies-billion-dollar-box-office-club-worldwide/ https://www.thewrap.com/movies-billion-dollar-box-office-club-worldwide/#respond Sun, 29 Oct 2017 23:36:22 +0000 Meriah Doty https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1025570 Films That Topped $1 Billion (Photos)

The coveted billion-dollar club continues to grow with films like “Jurassic World,” “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and more surpassing $1 billion at the box office.

In the so-called club are older films, too, like “Avatar” and “Titanic” — both directed by James Cameron — along with 1993’s “Jurassic Park,” 2011’s “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2” and 2003’s “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.”

Other films to join the ranks of features that have topped $1 billion globally are Marvel movies, distributed by Disney: “Marvel’s The Avengers,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” and “Iron Man 3.”

Both “Dark Knight” films directed by Christopher Nolan broke a billion.

“Avatar” — $2.79B (20th Century Fox, 2009)

“Titanic” — $2.19B (Paramount, 1997)

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” — $2.07B (Disney, 2015)

“Jurassic World” — $1.67B (Universal, 2015)

“Finding Dory” — $1.00B (Disney-Pixar, 2016)

“The Dark Knight” — $1.00B (Warner Bros., 2008)

“Marvel’s The Avengers” — $1.52B (Disney, 2012)

“Furious 7” — $1.52 billion (Universal, 2015)

After five weekends at the box office, “Rogue One” hit the $1 billion benchmark globally.

Having now earned $485 million domestically and $517 million overseas, Disney-Pixar’s “Finding Dory” crossed $1 billion globally.

The animated feature is Pixar’s second billion-dollar title, along with “Toy Story 3,” and The Walt Disney Studios’ fourth billion-dollar film in the past year.

“Dory” is now the fifth highest grossing animated film of all time globally.

The film was among only three of this summer’s many sequels — also Universal-Blumhouse-Platinum Dune’s “The Purge: Election Year” and Disney-Marvel’s “Captain America: Civil War” — to outperform their predecessors at the box office.

But being a blockbuster doesn’t guarantee a follow-up. A source close to Disney told TheWrap previously that there are absolutely no immediate plans in motion to make sequels to “Finding Dory” or “Captain America.” A “Dory” followup wouldn’t conceivably come for at least another six years given the fact that Pixar is hitting a hard pause button on sequels until roughly 2022.

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https://www.thewrap.com/movies-billion-dollar-box-office-club-worldwide/feed/ 0 Billion-dollar movies aren't as rare as they used to be. Still, there aren't that many of them. See them all here: 

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Billion-dollar movies aren't as rare as they used to be. Still, there aren't that many of them. See them all here: 

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"Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" -- $1.01 billion (Disney, 2016)

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"Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" -- $1.01 billion (Disney, 2016)

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"Finding Dory" -- $1.00 billion (Disney-Pixar, 2016)

 

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"Finding Dory" -- $1.00 billion (Disney-Pixar, 2016)

 

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"The Dark Knight" -- $1.00 billion (Warner Bros., 2008)

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"The Dark Knight" -- $1.00 billion (Warner Bros., 2008)

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"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" -- $1.02 billion (Warner Bros., 2012)

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"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" -- $1.02 billion (Warner Bros., 2012)

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"Zootopia" -- $1.02 billion (Disney, 2016)

 

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"Zootopia" -- $1.02 billion (Disney, 2016)

 

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"Alice in Wonderland" -- $1.03 billion (Disney, 2010)

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"Alice in Wonderland" -- $1.03 billion (Disney, 2010)

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"Despicable Me 3" -- $1.03 billion (Universal, 2017)

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"Despicable Me 3" -- $1.03 billion (Universal, 2017)

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"Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace" -- $1.03 billion (20th Century Fox)

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"Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace" -- $1.03 billion (20th Century Fox)

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"Jurassic Park" -- $1.03 billion (Universal, 1993)

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"Jurassic Park" -- $1.03 billion (Universal, 1993)

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"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" -- $1.05 billion (Disney, 2011)

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"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" -- $1.05 billion (Disney, 2011)

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"Toy Story 3" -- $1.06 billion (Disney, 2010)

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"Toy Story 3" -- $1.06 billion (Disney, 2010)

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"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest" -- $1.07 billion (Disney, 2006)

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"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest" -- $1.07 billion (Disney, 2006)

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"The Dark Knight Rises" -- $1.08 billion (Warner Bros., 2012)

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"The Dark Knight Rises" -- $1.08 billion (Warner Bros., 2012)

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"Transformers: Age of Extinction" -- $1.10 billion (Paramount, 2014)

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"Transformers: Age of Extinction" -- $1.10 billion (Paramount, 2014)

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"Skyfall" -- $1.11 billion (Sony, 2012)

 

 

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"Skyfall" -- $1.11 billion (Sony, 2012)

 

 

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"Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" -- $1.12 billion (New Line, 2003) 

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"Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" -- $1.12 billion (New Line, 2003) 

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"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" -- $1.12 billion (Paramount, 2011)

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"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" -- $1.12 billion (Paramount, 2011)

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"Captain America: Civil War" -- $1.15 billion (Disney, 2016)

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"Captain America: Civil War" -- $1.15 billion (Disney, 2016)

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"Minions" -- $1.16 billion (Universal, 2015)

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"Minions" -- $1.16 billion (Universal, 2015)

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"Iron Man 3" -- $1.22 billion (Disney, 2013)

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"Iron Man 3" -- $1.22 billion (Disney, 2013)

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"Beauty and the Beast" -- $1.26 billion (Disney, 2017)

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"Beauty and the Beast" -- $1.26 billion (Disney, 2017)

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"The Fate of the Furious" -- $1.26 billion (Universal, 2017)

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"The Fate of the Furious" -- $1.26 billion (Universal, 2017)

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"Frozen" -- $1.28 billion (Disney, 2013)

 

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"Frozen" -- $1.28 billion (Disney, 2013)

 

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"Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2" -- $1.34 billion (Warner Bros., 2011)

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"Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2" -- $1.34 billion (Warner Bros., 2011)

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"Avengers: Age of Ultron" -- $1.41 billion (Disney, 2015)

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"Avengers: Age of Ultron" -- $1.41 billion (Disney, 2015)

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"Furious 7" -- $1.52 billion (Universal, 2015)

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"Furious 7" -- $1.52 billion (Universal, 2015)

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"Marvel's The Avengers" -- $1.52 billion (Disney, 2012)

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"Marvel's The Avengers" -- $1.52 billion (Disney, 2012)

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"Jurassic World" -- $1.67 billion (Universal, 2015)

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"Jurassic World" -- $1.67 billion (Universal, 2015)

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"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" -- $2.07 billion (Disney, 2015)

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"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" -- $2.07 billion (Disney, 2015)

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"Titanic" -- $2.19 billion (Paramount, 1997)

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"Titanic" -- $2.19 billion (Paramount, 1997)

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"Avatar" -- $2.79 billion (20th Century Fox, 2009)

 

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"Avatar" -- $2.79 billion (20th Century Fox, 2009)

 

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Gerard Butler’s ‘Geostorm’ Could Lose as Much as $100 Million https://www.thewrap.com/gerard-butlers-geostorm-lose-much-100-million/ https://www.thewrap.com/gerard-butlers-geostorm-lose-much-100-million/#respond Tue, 24 Oct 2017 21:03:48 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1728988

Nearly 20 months after it was initially scheduled for release, “Geostorm” finally arrived in theaters this weekend and quickly capsized at the box office.

Against a budget of $120 million, which included $15 million for extensive reshoots, the global warming cautionary tale has only made a reported $66.8 million worldwide, including $14.7 million domestically. So, how much money will “Geostorm” lose?

Starring Gerard Butler as an engineer trying to fix a satellite system designed to end climate change, the Warner Bros.-Skydance movie focuses on human-triggered global catastrophes.

The film is the second biggest flop for Warner Bros. this year, after “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” failed to recoup its $175 million budget back in May. It’s also another flop for Skydance, which co-financed “Baywatch” with Paramount earlier this year, making only $177 million worldwide against a $69 million production budget.

Box office and finance analysts who spoke with TheWrap estimate that the break-even point for “Geostorm” is likely between $300 million and $350 million worldwide. Usually, for a non-franchise event release, the bar is set between $350 million and $400 million. But WB cut its marketing budget for the weather-themed catastrophe movie after pushing back the release date three times from March 2016 to this past weekend, when no Thursday preview screenings were held. It didn’t help that critics gave it a 13 percent Rotten Tomatoes score.

“There really wasn’t a lot of advertising for this movie, and that’s a sign that WB was willing to cut their losses,” said Exhibitor Relations analyst Jeff Bock.

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This weekend, “Geostorm” will roll out in China, but it’s highly unlikely that the Middle Kingdom will bail out this disaster film as only 25 percent of Chinese box office revenue goes to studios. Then, the following weekend, “Geostorm” will be effectively drowned out as “Thor: Ragnarok” sucks up all the attention from moviegoers. By the end of its run, analysts expect that the film will be lucky to make $200 million worldwide, putting “Geostorm” as much as $100 million in the red.

Along with “King Arthur,” “Geostorm” is the fifth film with a $100 million-plus price tag to fall apart at the box office this year. Other big flops include “Monster Trucks” ($64 million worldwide gross against a $125 million budget), “Ghost In The Shell” ($169 million gross/$110 million budget), and “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets” ($225 million gross/$177 million budget).

The good news for WB is that they have put themselves in good enough of a position to take the hit. The film was co-financed with Skydance and Ratpac, meaning the three studios will share the loss between them. Also, unlike when “King Arthur” was in theaters, WB has built up an immense amount of revenue over the past four months. Its last four hit releases, “Wonder Woman,” “Dunkirk,” “Annabelle: Creation” and “It,” have grossed a combined $2.3 billion worldwide and given the studio an industry-best 20.3 percent of domestic market share for 2017, according to Box Office Mojo. With such success, the writedown WB will take for “Geostorm” pales in comparison.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Killing of a Sacred Deer,' 'Wonderstruck' Strike Big at Indie Box Office

4 Reasons 'Geostorm' Hit Stormy Waters at the Box Office

'Boo! 2' Wins Gruesome Box Office Weekend With $21 Million Opening

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Can ‘Happy Death Day’ Keep Blumhouse’s Box Office Momentum Going? https://www.thewrap.com/can-happy-death-day-keep-blumhouses-box-office-momentum-going/ https://www.thewrap.com/can-happy-death-day-keep-blumhouses-box-office-momentum-going/#respond Wed, 11 Oct 2017 21:35:31 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1722009 At the start of 2017, Universal and Jason Blum’s Blumhouse took over headlines throughout Hollywood with the success of “Split” and “Get Out,” which combined to gross $531 million worldwide against a combined budget of $13.5 million.

Now, the studio and production duo are back with “Happy Death Day,” another low-budget horror film that will serve as Blumhouse’s entry to this year’s Halloween season.

While it’s expected to be the No. 1 film this weekend, “Happy Death Day” is tracking well behind Blumhouse’s other recent releases, with independent projections estimating an $18-20 million opening this weekend from 3,130 screens. Universal projects a mid-teens opening.

By comparison, “Get Out” grossed $33 million in its opening, while “Split” debuted to $40 million.

That’s not a good sign for a box office that has seen September’s “It”-fueled boom wear off. But for Blumhouse, there’s still a chance that this film could overperform, particularly among moviegoers under 25.

Teens played a critical role in the success of “It,” with 15 percent of opening weekend audiences coming from the under-18 crowd despite the film’s R rating. “Happy Death Day” has a PG-13 rating, making it more accessible to high schoolers. And early reviews have been good so far, with a 71 percent Rotten Tomatoes rating.

“Happy Death Day” stars Jessica Rothe as a college student forced to relive the day of her murder over and over until she discovers who the killer is. Christopher  B. Landon directed the film from a script by Scott Lobdell. .

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Also opening this weekend is STX’s “The Foreigner,” a revenge thriller starring Jackie Chan as a London businessman who hunts the terrorists who killed his daughter. Martin Campbell’s film, which also stars Pierce Brosnan, is projected for a $10-12 million opening from 2,515 screens.

Finally, there is Open Road’s “Marshall,” a biopic starring Chadwick Boseman as Thurgood Marshall in one of the future Supreme Court Justice’s first legal cases.

Reginald Hudlin’s film — which also stars Josh Gad, Kate Hudson, Dan Stevens, Sterling K. Brown, and James Cromwell — is projected to open at  $3-4 million from 821 screens against a $12 million budget.

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With ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Struggles, October Box Office Looks Rough https://www.thewrap.com/october-box-office-blade-runner/ https://www.thewrap.com/october-box-office-blade-runner/#respond Mon, 09 Oct 2017 22:53:50 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1721702 After an “It”-fueled surge in September, the box office is slowing down again in the early stages of October. After “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” closed out last month by taking the top spot with just $17 million, “Blade Runner 2049” surprisingly underperformed with $32.7 million, well below hopes of a $45-50 million start.

But despite that letdown, it could still have the highest opening weekend of this month, as the remaining releases on the October slate aren’t expected to do any better.

This weekend, the film expected to take the top spot is Universal/Blumhouse’s “Happy Death Day,” which is projecting for a $18-20 million bow.

From 2010-2015, the highest opening total for an October release was at least $45 million, with 2013’s “Gravity” and 2015’s “The Martian” pushing above $50 million. But last year, all of October’s releases had openings of under $25 million, resulting in the lowest total revenue for the month since 2007. While this October will see a small flow of revenue from “It” with moviegoers flocking to it again as Halloween approaches, it’s looking like this month’s offerings will perform as disappointingly as last year’s did.

The September boom helped 2017’s year-to-date totals catch up to 2016, dropping the deficit from 6.3 percent to 4.7 percent, but by the time this month comes to an end, much of that progress could be undone.

“There was a little hope that we could ride it out this month until we get to a much better November,” said Exhibitor Relations analyst Jeff Bock. “But this is going to be a really rough month. The only possible hope I can see is if ‘Happy Death Day’ is able to get a strong turnout from the high school and college-age crowd, which is where horror has been getting a lot of traction recently.”

Indeed, even though “It” was an R-Rated film, comScore says that teens made up 15 percent of the audience that contributed to its record $123 million opening.

“Happy Death Day,” which follows a college-age girl forced to relive the day of her murder over and over again until she figures out the killer, could possibly perform above expectations if it can court younger audiences.

Its PG-13 rating will help with that, as will the fact that it is being produced by Blumhouse, the studio that turned “Get Out” and “Split” into box office juggernauts this past winter.

But for now, the forecast points to another dry spell for movie theaters, which will be anxiously waiting for “Thor: Ragnarok” to come to the rescue at the start of November. Early tracking for the next Marvel installment will arrive this Thursday.

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Could ‘Kingsman’ or ‘Lego Ninjago’ Dethrone ‘It’ as Box Office Champ? https://www.thewrap.com/kingsman-lego-ninjago-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/kingsman-lego-ninjago-box-office/#respond Tue, 19 Sep 2017 23:33:29 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1711222 After dominating the box office for the past two weeks with no serious opposition, “It” is about to get some company in the form of Fox’s “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” and Warner Bros.’ “The Lego Ninjago Movie,” both of which should add to what has already been a very lucrative September.

According to data from comScore, grosses since Labor Day are up nearly 40 percent compared to the same time frame last year, and the year-to-date deficit has dropped below five percent compared to 2016 after growing to as much as six percent in the wake of a dismal August.

It seems that box office booms seem to have just switched months.

While 2016 saw “Suicide Squad” carry the box office through August and was followed with a quiet September, 2017 is seeing the exact opposite with the record-breaking “It” pushing returns out of the doldrums. And while “Kingsman” and “Ninjago” won’t break records the way “It” did, they should, combined with a robust third-weekend performance from the Stephen King horror, put this weekend’s total results on the same level as the previous two weekends.

“It shows you the see-saw nature of the industry,” says comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian. “We’ve heard studios talk about how they can release a big film any time, but now they’re really putting their money where their mouth is. The ‘It’/’Kingsman’/’Ninjago’ combo should make September almost seem like summer, and that really doesn’t happen,” he added.

“Kingsman: The Golden Circle” is expected to take the No. 1 slot this weekend, with both studio and independent projections expecting an opening in the low $40 million range from 4,000 screens against a $104 million budget. The sequel’s 2015 predecessor, “Kingsman: The Secret Service,” grossed a $36.2 million opening from its mid-February release, going on to gross $128.2 million domestic and $414 million worldwide against an $81 million budget. Reviews for the film have been mixed so far, with Rotten Tomatoes currently giving it 56 percent.

“The Lego Ninjago Movie” is projected by trackers to make a solid $35 million this weekend, with WB putting its target a little lower at around $30 million. That’s a drop from the $69 million made by “The Lego Movie” and the $53 million made by “The Lego Batman Movie” earlier this year, but that is to be expected as “Ninjago” sports a lesser-known franchise and doesn’t dabble in the pop culture references the previous films used to gain crossover appeal.

“Kingsman: The Golden Circle” sees dapper super-spy Eggsy (Taron Egerton) return to stop the evil terror ring known as The Golden Circle with the help of the Kingsmen’s American counterparts, the Statesmen. Colin Firth, Jeff Bridges, Julianne Moore, Channing Tatum and Halle Berry also star. Matthew Vaughn directed the film, penned the script with Jane Goldman, and produced with David Reid and Adam Bohling.

“The Lego Ninjago Movie” follows six young aspiring ninjas as they train under Master Wu (Jackie Chan) to protect the land of Ninjago from an invasion by the evil Lord Garmadon (Justin Theroux), father of the ninjas’ leader, Lloyd (Dave Franco). Fred Armisen, Olivia Munn and Kumail Nanjiani also star. Charlie Bean, Paul Fisher, and Bob Logan are directors.

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Will ‘It’ Have ‘Get Out’-Style Staying Power at the Box Office? https://www.thewrap.com/it-pennywise-get-out-momentum-drop-off-box-office-horror-record/ https://www.thewrap.com/it-pennywise-get-out-momentum-drop-off-box-office-horror-record/#respond Wed, 13 Sep 2017 00:39:11 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1706309 We’ve never had a situation where an R-rated horror movie’s box office performance can be compared to that of a major superhero film, but “It” has managed to do just that after making a genre record-shattering $123 million opening this past weekend. It’s the third highest opening of the year, and at a $35 million budget, it’s the cheapest movie ever to earn a $100 million-plus opening.

Now the next question is, can the film keep this strong showing going into the coming weekends?

Early signs are already looking good. On Monday, “It” made a whopping $8.8 million at the box office, the most ever on a Monday in September. At $132 million, it is expected to pass “The Green Mile” to take the domestic box office record for any Stephen King adaptation after Tuesday’s numbers are added.

Traditionally, horror movies have a reputation for being front-loaded when it comes to box office performance. Hardcore fans of the genre pack the seats on opening weekend, but after that, there’s little mainstream interest to keep numbers up in the following weeks. One example of this is “Paranormal Activity 3,” which had one of the biggest horror openings ever prior to “It” when it made $52 million in October 2011. That ended up being half of “PA3”‘s total domestic gross, as the following weekend it fell 65.5 percent to $18.1 million.

But the major horror successes of 2017 have been able to take advantage of strategic release dates and built-up audience interest to find longer-lasting box office success, namely, “Get Out.” Having hooked the attention of moviegoers who wouldn’t usually go to a horror film, “Get Out” kept its drop-off below 35 percent through its first four weekends even in a busy March market, starting with a $33.3 million opening, followed by $28.2 million in its second frame. “Get Out” finished its run with $175.4 million, boasting an incredible multiple of 5.26 times what it earned in its opening weekend.

“It” will be aiming for similar longevity, but on a larger scale — much larger than anyone anticipated. By the end of next weekend, “It” should blow by “Get Out”‘s domestic total, enter the top 10 list for 2017, and will soon become the 15th R-Rated film to gross more than $200 million. It’s not expected to face very stiff competition this weekend, as new releases “American Assassin” and “mother!” aren’t projected to make more than $15 million in their respective openings. A drop-off of less than 60 percent will give “It” $50 million, putting it in the neighborhood of the $56 million second-frame total that “Deadpool,” the R-rated movie opening record holder, made last year.

Tougher competition will come next weekend in the form of “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” an R-Rated action sequel that is aimed at the 18 to 35 demographic that “It” went after and is projected to make $45 million to $50 million. Then, in October, we will see if “It” will become the Halloween horror film of choice for audiences as it competes for attention against Universal’s “Happy Death Day” and the return of the “Saw” series in Lionsgate’s “Jigsaw.”

And if “It” shows longevity, it will soon be on pace to pass this year’s highest-earning R-Rated film, “Logan,” which made $226 million domestically. If that happens, Hollywood may soon be talking about whether it’s time to start putting more money into horror.

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Can ‘Mother!’ or ‘American Assassin’ Poke a Hole in ‘It’ Box Office Balloon? https://www.thewrap.com/can-american-assassin-or-mother-poke-a-hole-in-it-box-office-balloon/ https://www.thewrap.com/can-american-assassin-or-mother-poke-a-hole-in-it-box-office-balloon/#respond Tue, 12 Sep 2017 22:03:45 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1707108 Last week, “It” became horror’s biggest box office hit ever, making more than $123 million and on pace to blast into 2017’s top 10 highest domestic gross list. The scary Stephen King adaptation is also expected to stay in the No. 1 spot this weekend without any serious competition, even from another, far more disturbing film that’s coming out.

That would be Paramount’s “mother!,” the highly polarizing psychological thriller from Darren Aronofsky that has had critics buzzing since it premiered at the Venice Film Festival. The film currently has a 77 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, with reviews calling it a piece of audacious, extreme cinema. While “It” aims to provide fun scares with a sewer-dwelling, sharp-toothed clown, “mother!” aims to genuinely disturb its audience.

To protect that unnerving experience, Paramount has staged a very secretive marketing campaign featuring a bare-bones synopsis: “A couple’s relationship (Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem) is tested when uninvited guests (Ed Harris and Michelle Pfeiffer) arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence.” Because of its intense material and opaque advertising, “mother!” isn’t built for the masses like “It.” Instead, it’s aiming for moviegoers looking for a more challenging and unexpected horror ride. Projections have the film earning an opening in between $12 million to $14 million from 2,369 locations, against a production budget of $30 million.

Also releasing this weekend is Lionsgate/CBS Films’ “American Assassin,” an action film based on the Mitch Rapp novel series by Vince Flynn, starring Dylan O’Brien (the “Maze Runner” series), Michael Keaton and Taylor Kitsch. Like “mother!”, it is also projected to earn a $12-14 million opening from more than 3,000 screens, with a similar budget of $33 million. Studio insiders tell TheWrap that a $14 million start would be considered a success for this film, as it would match the opening made by “John Wick” in 2014.

“mother!” is written and directed by Darren Aronofsky, with Scott Franklin and Ari Handel producing. “American Asssassin” is directed by Michael Cuesta and written by Stephen Schiff, Michael Finch, Edward Zwick and Marshall Herskovitz. Lorenzo di Bonaventura and Nick Wechsler are producing.

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No, Bad Rotten Tomatoes Scores Aren’t to Blame for Lousy Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/bad-rotten-tomatoes-scores-lousy-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/bad-rotten-tomatoes-scores-lousy-box-office/#respond Tue, 12 Sep 2017 15:05:15 +0000 Carli Velocci https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1706844 Is Rotten Tomatoes really to blame for this summer’s weak box office? According to one study, no.

Yves Bergquist, director of the Data & Analytics Project at USC’s Entertainment Technology Center, published findings on Medium Monday, showing that there appears to be no connection between Rotten Tomatoes score and box office results.

Bergquist compared box office data, according to Box Office Mojo, along with Rotten Tomatoes scores and audience scores for those titles (150 in all from 2017). He found that there was no correlation — positive or negative — between box office and Rotten Tomatoes score.

He even narrowed it down to just summer releases and the result was similar, with no “meaningful impact.”

In fact, by looking at the median scores over multiple summers, he found that Rotten Tomatoes scores are actually up by a few points, meaning that critics are liking more summer releases.

The study was released following a New York Times article, “Attacked by Rotten Tomatoes,” which reported Hollywood executives were blaming the review aggregate website for one of the worst summer movie seasons in years. Director Brett Ratner, for example, called it “the destruction of our business.”

“It’s unclear how much of some creative executives’ opinions related by The New York Times reflect actual belief that critics are hurting the top line, and how much they reflect the need to scapegoat Rotten Tomatoes,” he wrote. “What is clear, from looking at all film data since 2000, is that Rotten Tomatoes scores have never played a very big role in driving box office performance, either positively or negatively.”

Additionally, Bergquist found one correlation that was starting to add up — between audience scores and Rotten Tomatoes scores. He took this to mean that moviegoing fans are becoming more savvy and are aligning more with critics.

“Audiences are becoming experts at smelling a ‘bad’ movie and staying away,” he wrote. “When Hollywood executives complain about Rotten Tomatoes scores, they actually complain about their audiences’ tastes, because it’s almost the same thing.”

This extra piece of information puts a pin in the belief that some movies are for fans while others are for critics, which was the excuse made for “Baywatch” following its poor box office performance.

There are even more findings in the post, which you can view over on Medium.

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‘Rebel in the Rye’ Tops Weak Indie Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/rebel-in-the-rye-tops-weak-indie-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/rebel-in-the-rye-tops-weak-indie-box-office/#respond Sun, 10 Sep 2017 21:20:46 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1705696 With the Venice Film Festival now complete and the deals at Toronto just getting started, this weekend was a slow one for the indie box office. The lone standout this weekend was IFC’s J.D. Salinger biopic “Rebel in the Rye,” which made $44,280 from four screens for a PSA of $11,070.

Written and directed by Danny Strong, the film stars Nicholas Hoult as J.D. Salinger, as he navigates his relationship with socialite Oona O’Neill (Zoey Deutch) while writing his most famous work, “Catcher In The Rye.” Sarah Paulson and Kevin Spacey also star. The film received a 33 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Also released this week was “9/11,” a drama that takes place during the Sept. 11 attacks that stars Charlie Sheen, Whoopi Goldberg and Gina Gershon. Distributed by Atlas, the film’s trailer received heavy backlash and currently has a 20 percent RT score from just five reviews filed. The film bombed hard this weekend, making just $162,540 on 400 screens for a PSA of just $406.

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In its second weekend, the PBS documentary “Dolores” expanded to five screens and held on well, making $53,610 for a PSA of $10,722. Pantelion/Lionsgate’s “Do It Like an Hombre” pushed past the $2 million mark in its second weekend after making $375,000 from 382 screens. In its third week, Neon’s “Beach Rats” expanded to 34 screens and made $72,591 to bring its total to $208,440, while Sony Pictures Classics’ “Maudie” hauled itself past the $6 million mark in its 13th weekend with just under $44,000.

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5 Reasons ‘It’ Became Horror’s Biggest Box Office Success Ever https://www.thewrap.com/5-reasons-it-became-horrors-biggest-box-office-success-ever/ https://www.thewrap.com/5-reasons-it-became-horrors-biggest-box-office-success-ever/#respond Sun, 10 Sep 2017 18:17:18 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1705648 Boy, did the box office need this one. After the weakest Labor Day weekend since the turn of the century, Warner Bros./New Line Cinema’s “It” came in and outperformed not only the optimistic analyst projections, but also the entire four-day revenue from last weekend with a $117.1 million opening. 

With that result, “It” narrowly beats out “Spider-Man: Homecoming” for the third-biggest opening of 2017, and more than doubles the record set by “Hannibal” for the biggest horror movie opening of all-time. With strong reception from critics and constant, positive word-of-mouth keeping the money pouring in, “It” is just the latest and greatest success story in what has been an impressive year for horror with films like “Get Out,” “Split” and “Annabelle: Creation.”

It remains to be seen whether “It” can perform as well in the coming weeks as other WB films like “Wonder Woman” and “Dunkirk” have after their openings, as horror movies tend to be front-loaded when it comes to their box office performance. But it has as good a shot to be a Halloween moneymaker, as WB and New Line have turned this remake into a must-see film thanks to a solid marketing campaign and the quality work by director Andy Muschietti and his team that capitalized on the hype. Here’s how they got there:

1.) Strong trailers

The hype for “It” can be traced back to the end of March, when the first trailer for the film was released. Featuring a glimpse at director Andy Muschietti‘s spin on the infamous rain gutter scene, the trailer has been seen over 34 million times on YouTube and helped pique interest in the film in all demographics several months in advance. Over the summer, many under-performing films had either the hype or the good reviews, but not both. Like its fellow WB films “Wonder Woman” and “Dunkirk,” “It” had both. And on top of that, it had a marketing team that knew how to handle its villain… 

2.) Pennywise

In the first trailer and poster, Pennywise’s evil visage couldn’t be seen except for a few quick frames. Tim Curry’s legendary portrayal of Pennywise has become a frequent inspiration for internet memes, so naturally there was interest in how Bill Skarsgard’s version of the killer clown would look and act.

For about a month, WB and New Line kept Pennywise under wraps, obscuring his face with his signature red balloon. Then, once his character was revealed, the marketing doubled down on his new look, with posters featuring him in all his carny glory and trailers that showed him terrorizing the children in attics and sewers. By slowly teasing out the new Pennywise with intrigue and terror, WB kept the interest going through the summer months.

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3.) Unique marketing

On top of that, special marketing events allowed the most hardcore Stephen King fans to come face-to-face with Pennywise in a variety of ways. Foremost among these was an immersive haunted house set up on Hollywood and Vine. Meanwhile, fans not in Los Angeles could try out a virtual reality experience that took them on an intense ride inside Pennywise’s sewer pipes.

While other films like “The Mummy” have tried this marketing, “It” was able to make it work because it had the trailers and familiar adaptation material as a strong foundation to generate interest in the immersive fan experiences. Now thrill-seekers could plunge themselves deep into the same horror that filled those trailers, and that experience, in turn, generated more interest to see the film.

4.) September is more than a “dumping ground”

It can’t be said for sure what sort of opening “It” would have had but it certainly would have helped stop the bleeding suffered by the weakest summer box office season in over a decade.

But of all the companies in Hollywood, Warner Bros. was the one stressing out the least this summer. After putting out a bomb with “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” in May, the studio has put out successful films in each of the past three months: “Wonder Woman” in June, “Dunkirk” in July and “Annabelle: Creation” in August. “Annabelle” was the sole positive result last month, making $35 million in its opening weekend — a solid result for a horror film — and is on pace to cross $100 million domestic this coming week.

With those movies continuing to bring in audiences through summer’s end, early September became the perfect release slot for “It.” While “Annabelle: Creation” was a horror movie that appealed to hardcore genre fans, “It” has crossover appeal, reaching out to moviegoers that haven’t had a must-see film on theater slates since “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “Dunkirk” came out two months ago. Audience demographics have shown widespread interest in the film, with gender breakdown virtually split 50-50 while 65 percent of moviegoers were over the age of 25.

5.) The “Stranger Things” factor

But the appeal of “It” to a wide audience — and particularly to Gen Xers — shouldn’t be surprising considering the success of last year’s big Netflix hit, “Stranger Things.” “It” certainly lends itself to comparisons to “Stranger Things,” particularly considering that the show’s star, Finn Wolfhard, also appears in this movie. “Stranger Things” creators Matt and Ross Duffer also list Stephen King’s novel as an inspiration for their show. 

But on top of the similarities between two stories about kids facing unspeakable horrors, both “It” and “Stranger Things” appeal to nostalgia for 80s pop culture. While Stephen King’s novel sees the Losers take on Pennywise in 1950s Maine, Muschietti’s version places the story in the 80s and, like “Stranger Things,” makes several cultural references to that decade. That change only further connects the story’s environment to the one many 80s kids were immersed in when they sat in terror watching Tim Curry’s Pennywise do his macabre antics on a TV miniseries that gave many young minds their first taste of R-rated intensity.

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‘It’ to Scare Away Box Office Dry Spell With Record $60 Million Opening https://www.thewrap.com/it-box-office-preview/ https://www.thewrap.com/it-box-office-preview/#respond Wed, 06 Sep 2017 21:15:01 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1703201

After two weekends of no new wide releases, box office analysts are hoping that. Warner Bros./New Line’s “It” can revitalize movie theaters after months worth of hype.

Since tracking began three weeks ago, “It” has been projected to blow away the record set by “Hotel Transylvania 2” for the biggest opening weekend for a September release. Both studio and independent projections have the horror film making $60-65 million this weekend from 4,000 screens, blowing by the previous record of $48.4 million. But some trackers are expecting even bigger things for “It,” projecting results as high as $70-75 million.

It’s a big return movie theaters desperately need after an end to the summer season that included the worst Labor Day weekend in 18 years and a final summer tally that was nearly 15 percent worse than last year. Year-to-date totals are nearly down six percent from 2016, with some analysts believing it’s unlikely that the final four months of the year can push 2017 totals past last year’s benchmark of $11.3 billion.

All the pieces seem to be in place for “It” to have a huge start. The first teaser trailer quickly went viral after its release in late March and currently has over 32 million views on YouTube. Since then, WB and New Line have unleashed a marketing campaign that included a gradual reveal of the new Pennywise, along with a VR experience and a haunted house on Hollywood/Vine.

Now the hype has been backed up with strong critical reception. Rotten Tomatoes currently gives the film a score of 89 percent, with 74 reviews registered. Meanwhile, Fandango reports that “It” has set a new site record for presales for any horror film or September release. If audiences embrace the scares as much as critics have, it could mean strong long-term performance for the film, as it could become a popular choice during Halloween season.

Based on Stephen King’s famous novel and the 1990 TV miniseries starring Tim Curry, “It” tells the story of several young misfits in small-town Maine as they try to uncover the mysterious disappearance of several people over the years, leading them face-to-face with the evil Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard). Jaeden Lieber, Finn Wolfhard, and Sophia Lillis also star. Andres Muschietti directed from a script written by Chase Palmer, Cary Joji Fukunaga, and  Gary Dauberman. Producers are Roy Lee, Dan Lin, Barbara Muschietti, Seth Grahame-Smith, and David Katzenberg.

Also opening this weekend is Open Road’s “Home Again,” a romantic comedy starring Reese Witherspoon as a divorced mother of two who moves with her kids back to her hometown of Los Angeles, only to have her life changed when she allows three young aspiring filmmakers to move in. The film is projected to make $10 million this weekend.

The comedy also stars Michael Sheen and Candice Bergen and is written and directed by Hallie Meyers-Shyer. Nancy Myers and Erika Olde are producers.

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No Box Office Relief in Sight After Summer Attendance Hits 25-Year Low https://www.thewrap.com/no-box-office-relief-sight-summer-hits-25-year-low/ https://www.thewrap.com/no-box-office-relief-sight-summer-hits-25-year-low/#respond Tue, 05 Sep 2017 23:55:21 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1702606 Labor Day is done, the summer box office season is now closed, and the numbers are abysmal.

The final revenue total for the box office from May 5 to Labor Day stands at $3.83 billion, making this summer the first since 2006 to finish below $4 billion. Compared to last summer, that total is 14.6 percent lower, tying summer 2014 for the biggest year-to-year drop for the season.

As for annual totals, after a strong start to the year that included the most profitable March ever, the weak summer has erased Q1 profits and put 2017 down six percent year-to-date. Starting this weekend, exhibitors will get a bailout with anticipated films like “It” and “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” on the September slate, but even if the last four months of 2017 can push annual revenue to more than $11 billion (just less than 2016 overall domestic grosses), attendance is still expected to hit a 25-year low at approximately 1.22 billion tickets sold.

If that happens, then this summer will have been a microcosm for the overall attendance crash. Based on the national average ticket price of $8.89, approximately 430 million tickets were sold this summer, according to Box Office Mojo. That’s by far the lowest since 1992, and while next summer should see a strong rebound with films like “Avengers: Infinity War” and “Deadpool 2” leading the slate, it’s likely to be only a minor rally in what has been a continuous decline in movie theater attendance over the past 12 years.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Box Office Bummer: 'Hitman's Bodyguard' Makes $13 Million in Worst Labor Day Weekend Since 1999

This Labor Day Weekend Box Office Is Worst in 19 Years

Box Office Woes: This Could Be the Worst Labor Day Weekend in 30 Years

Fall Box Office Preview: After Summer Crash, Can A Strong Season Save 2017?

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Box Office Bummer: ‘Hitman’s Bodyguard’ Makes $13 Million in Worst Labor Day Weekend Since 1999 https://www.thewrap.com/hitmans-bodyguard-box-office-13-million-in-worst-labor-day-weekend-since-1999/ https://www.thewrap.com/hitmans-bodyguard-box-office-13-million-in-worst-labor-day-weekend-since-1999/#respond Mon, 04 Sep 2017 16:16:01 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1701899 Lionsgate’s “The Hitman’s Bodyguard” will close out Labor Day Weekend with an estimated $13.3 million as the four-day box office totals drop to levels not seen since the turn of the century.

According to estimates from comScore, total revenue for the extended weekend is expected to top out at around $95 million.

The last time Labor Day Weekend totals fell below $100 million was in 1999, when poor numbers from new releases left holdover “The Sixth Sense” to carry the weekend to a $98 million total.

With no new releases for the second weekend in a row — and the first Labor Day without a new release since 1992 — there were some fears that weekend totals could sink even lower.

But strong holdover numbers from recent releases were able to stem the tide. Sitting just behind “Hitman’s Bodyguard” is Warner Bros.’ “Annabelle: Creation,” which finished with an estimated four-day total of $9.3 million to bring its cume to just under $91 million.

The Weinstein Company takes third and fourth place this weekend, with “Wind River” making $8 million after expanding 2,600 screens and “Leap!” making $6.5 million in its second weekend. “Logan Lucky” completes the top 5 with $5.6 million.

The widest new release this weekend was TWC’s “Tulip Fever,” which made only $1.4 million from 765 screens this weekend. It was outperformed by a 40th anniversary re-release of “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” which made $2.3 million from 900 locations.

With the summer box office season now at a close, the strong Q1 numbers brought by robust Oscar season releases and a record-breaking March have been erased, as year-to-date totals now stand 5.7 percent down from last year.

Late-year releases like “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” could push annual totals to a respectable finish, but aren’t expected to push them past the $11.3 billion made last year and could finish with an attendance count that’s the lowest since 1992.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Box Office Attendance Expected to Hit 25-Year Low

Fall Box Office Preview: After Summer Crash, Can A Strong Season Save 2017?

Why China and Other Overseas Markets Couldn't Save This Summer's Dismal Box Office

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Box Office Woes: This Could Be the Worst Labor Day Weekend in 30 Years https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-woes-worst-labor-day-weekend-30-years/ https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-woes-worst-labor-day-weekend-30-years/#respond Fri, 01 Sep 2017 00:45:38 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1701048 For the first time in a quarter-century, there will be no new wide releases at movie theaters on Labor Day Weekend. An that means box office returns could sink to levels not seen since the 1980s.

Last weekend, the box office, led by a second-week “Hitman’s Bodyguard,” made just $69 million, the lowest for any weekend since Sept. 21, 2001. This weekend is expected to be even worse, with the widest new release being a 40th anniversary re-release of Steven Spielberg’s “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” on 900 screens. Other targeted releases include The Weinstein Company’s “Tulip Fever” and Marvel Television’s IMAX release of the pilot episode of “Inhumans.”

Assuming a 50 percent drop in last week’s totals, plus an additional $9 million to 10 million on Labor Day, that would put four-day totals at approximately $45 million. To find the last Labor Day weekend that made that amount of money, you have to go all the way back to 1987, a year when August releases were so weak that “Dirty Dancing” was still in the top 3 at the box office despite being released a month prior.

While Labor Day Weekend has never been a prime release slot like Memorial Day Weekend, it has been a weekend that has offered one last burst of revenue for theaters to close out the summer. But after an August that has seen a year-to-year drop of over 35 percent, Labor Day Weekend 2017 could become the lowest performing weekend movie theaters have seen since the turn of the century. For theaters, Sept. 8 — and the arrival of the potentially record-breaking “It,” — can’t get here soon enough.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Box Office Attendance Expected to Hit 25-Year Low

Fall Box Office Preview: After Summer Crash, Can A Strong Season Save 2017?

Why China and Other Overseas Markets Couldn't Save This Summer's Dismal Box Office

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Box Office Attendance Expected to Hit 25-Year Low https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-attendance-25-year-low/ https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-attendance-25-year-low/#respond Thu, 31 Aug 2017 22:55:19 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1700954 Attendance at the box office is in danger of dropping to numbers not seen since the days of “Jurassic Park.”

Thanks to the weakest summer numbers since 2006, a strong first quarter for the 2017 box office has turned into a six percent year-to-date drop compared to 2016. It’s a gap so big that it’s considered unlikely that the total domestic revenue by year’s end will match the $11.3 billion made last year; in fact, one analyst told TheWrap that reaching $11 billion flat would be quite an achievement if films like “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” can get it there.

But even if it reaches that amount, the number of tickets sold this year could drop as low as 1.22 billion. That figure would be the lowest since 1992, according to Box Office Mojo. The estimated ticket total is calculated by dividing the total annual revenue against the national average movie ticket price, which Mojo has set at $8.89, up from $8.65 last year.

The good news in the short term is that the box office has seen similar attendance drops on two previous occasions in the past decade and has been able to rebound. In 2011, attendance dropped to 1.28 billion, and in 2014, it dropped to 1.26 billion. In each instance, business picked back up the following year thanks to films like “The Dark Knight Rises” and “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” 2018 should provide a similar rebound with films like “Star Wars: Han Solo,” “Deadpool 2,” and “Ralph Breaks The Internet.” Oh, and like those rebound years, 2018 has an “Avengers” film on its slate.

But long-term, even a 2018 rebound won’t stop the downward trend in attendance that movie theaters have seen over the past decade. With ticket prices steadily increasing and consumers flocking to at-home options like streaming and popular TV shows like “Game of Thrones,” only a handful of films each year have been able to retain must-see status. Even as premium formats and theater offers keep total revenue on an upward trend, the final attendance total for 2017 could be as much as 20 percent down from the industry high of 1.57 billion reached 15 years ago.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fall Box Office Preview: After Summer Crash, Can A Strong Season Save 2017?

Why China and Other Overseas Markets Couldn't Save This Summer's Dismal Box Office

Movie Franchise Watch: Superheroes Keep Rolling While Other Sequels Sink Summer Box Office

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Fall Box Office Preview: After Summer Crash, Can A Strong Season Save 2017? https://www.thewrap.com/fall-box-office-preview-fall-movies/ https://www.thewrap.com/fall-box-office-preview-fall-movies/#respond Thu, 31 Aug 2017 01:17:40 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1700223 Can 2017 box office be saved?

Fall movies will need to do booming business to make up for this summer’s slump: Summer ticket sales failed to cross $4 billion for the season for the first time in 11 years, Memorial Day weekend numbers were the lowest since 1998, and Labor Day weekend receipts are also likely to hit a 20-year low.

The year-to-date total is now 5.7 percent below the pace set last year. So the last four months of 2017 will need to yield about $3.8 billion to match the $11.3 billion total box office for 2016.

“Even just passing the $11 billion mark, even after failing to reach $4 billion in the summer for the first time since 2016, would be an achievement,” said comScore analyst Paul Dergarabedian.

The last four months of 2016 made $3.4 billion, while the last third of 2015, which included “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” made $3.6 billion.

The fall season will kick off in a big way with New Line Cinema’s highly anticipated “It.” Trackers expect it to set a September record with a $60 million-plus opening weekend and strong numbers leading up to Halloween. After that comes the action comedy “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” and the family friendly “Lego Ninjago Movie,” which are also expected to have solid openings.

There are no sure bets in October, though “Blade Runner 2049” arrives Oct. 6 with a strong pedigree: The sequel to Ridley Scott’s classic sci-fi film stars Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, and Jared Leto and is directed by “Arrival” filmmaker Denis Villeneuve.

One possible sleeper hit is “Happy Death Day,” a horror film from Universal and Blumhouse that aims to give the two studios another big 2017 win, continuing the success of “Get Out” and “Split.” Potential Oscar contenders like “Suburbicon” and “Downsizing” may also boost ticket sales.

The first heavyweight lands in theaters on Nov. 3: “Thor: Ragnarok.” It has received major social media attention, and its plot is expected to lead into next year’s much-anticipated “Avengers: Infinity War.”

On Nov. 17, Warner Bros unveils “Justice League,” which will give Wonder Woman fans a chance to see their heroine in action again just five months after she became the biggest box office draw of the summer.

On Nov. 22 comes “Coco,” a Pixar original and a likely Oscar contender — though it doesn’t have the built-in selling point of being part of a successful franchise.

Dec. 15 sees the debut of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” which continues the story of “The Force Awakens” and has the additional draw of Mark Hamill’s big return as Luke Skywalker. It also includes the final film appearance of the late Carrie Fisher.

Those films provide hope that 2017 could become the third consecutive year to cross $11 billion. But even if it does, there is still one other declining figure that will give exhibitors cause for concern: attendance.

With a ticket price average of $8.89, according to Box Office Mojo, $11 billion in annual revenue translates to roughly 1.23 billion tickets sold.

Hollywood hasn’t sold fewer than 1.25 billion tickets since 1993.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why China and Other Overseas Markets Couldn't Save This Summer's Dismal Box Office

Movie Franchise Watch: Superheroes Keep Rolling While Other Sequels Sink Summer Box Office

'It' Box Office Predictions Balloon to Record-Bursting $60 Million Opening

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Why China and Other Overseas Markets Couldn’t Save This Summer’s Dismal Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/summer-box-office-china-overseas-markets-couldnt-save/ https://www.thewrap.com/summer-box-office-china-overseas-markets-couldnt-save/#respond Tue, 29 Aug 2017 18:04:15 +0000 Matt Pressberg https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1697889 One stark lesson of this summer’s miserable box office: Studios may no longer be able to rely on overseas markets as a life raft for tentpoles that underperform in North America.

Paramount’s “Transformers: The Last Knight” grossed just $229 million in China, less than the $320 million 2014’s “Transformers: Age of Extinction” earned there when the country’s box office was significantly smaller. Worse, the total overseas revenue for “The Last Knight” was $471 million, nearly half the $859 million the previous installment earned.

As Hollywood’s domestic box office has cratered by more than 14 percent this summer, studios are discovering that other pricey studio projects — including Paramount’s “Baywatch” and Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” — are failing to score both at home and abroad.

“If [the box office] starts dwindling internationally, that’s a problem,” Paul Dergarabedian, the senior media analyst at ComScore, told TheWrap. “Studios have always counted on those international markets to make up the difference for any shortfall in the North American box office for specific films.”

But this year that strategy has proved to be less than meets the eye as established franchises are not proving to be as bankable as expected even as overseas box office has ticked up 3 percent so far this year (North American sales are down 6 percent for 2017 to date).

“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” earned about $70 million less domestically than its 2011 predecessor, “On Stranger Tides,” and was by far the lowest-grossing movie out of all five of Johnny Depp’s “Pirates” films.

While the franchise continued to perform fairly well overseas, with “Dead Men” reeling in $618 million in international markets, that was the smallest foreign gross since the first “Pirates” film, “The Curse of the Black Pearl,” which came out 14 years ago and made just $3 million in the world’s second-largest movie market, China.

“Dead Men” hauled in $172 million in China but it still fell nearly $200 million short of the foreign gross for “On Stranger Tides.”

Even “Baywatch,” based on an internationally syndicated show that reached upwards of 1 billion people a week in nearly 150 countries, earned just $119 million internationally and a dismal $58 million in North America despite megawatt headliner Dwayne Johnson and plenty of hype. That simply wasn’t enough to make up for its belly flop at home. (The R-rated comedy didn’t get past China’s regulators.)

But with China’s appetite for this summer’s crop of Hollywood hits relatively light, and certain tentpoles like Sony’s “Spider-Man: Homecoming” not even hitting the market yet (the superhero flick premieres in China on September 8), the Middle Kingdom hasn’t come through for Hollywood this year.

While studios only get about one-fourth of the Chinese theatrical gross, compared with roughly half in the U.S., the sheer size of that market has frequently bailed out big-budget would-be blockbusters that flopped at home.

Paramount’s “xXx: Return of Xander Cage” grossed just $45 million at the domestic box office earlier this year, but took in $301 million internationally, led by China with $164 million. Headliners Vin Diesel and Donnie Yen — two of China’s biggest stars — undoubtedly helped push it up the Middle Kingdom’s charts.

And Legendary’s video-game adaptation “Warcraft” earned just $47 million at the domestic box office last year, but brought in a whopping $386 million in international markets, including $214 million in China.

Dergarabedian said sometimes it takes just one movie to turn things around. That happened in China this summer, pushing its box office up 6 percent year-over-year — but Hollywood had nothing to do with the country’s home-grown $800 million smash hit “Wolf Warriors 2.”

And while the European box office held strong during the dog days — helped by Warner Bros.’ “Dunkirk” — that also wasn’t enough to save the industry’s bacon.

Christopher Nolan’s World War II epic was extremely popular in the United Kingdom, where it grossed $63.2 million, making it the country’s second highest-grossing film of the year after Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast.” “Dunkirk” has grossed $397 million worldwide through August 23.

AMC Theatres, the world’s largest cinema chain, may be the best example of what’s happened this summer. The company has expanded in Europe (and is owned by a major Chinese entertainment company, Dalian Wanda Group) but its geographic diversity couldn’t compensate for a disastrous summer season at home.

The company’s stock tanked about 25 percent earlier this month after AMC previewed disastrous second-quarter earnings. Still, AMC CEO Adam Aron told investors, “Gains in Europe were more than counterbalanced by the weak American results.”

The movie business may be more international than ever, but Hollywood still shapes the box office. And there was no saving this dry, cold American summer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'War for the Planet of the Apes' Is 'What a Summer Movie Should Be,' Critics Say

'Wonder Woman' Tops 'Spider-Man,' 'Pirates of the Caribbean' as Most Anticipated Summer Movie

13 Summer Movie Breakout Stars, From Zendaya to Brenton Thwaites (Photos)

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Franchise Fatigue Tracker: Which 2017 Summer Blockbusters Are Getting Sequels? (Photos) https://www.thewrap.com/franchise-fatigue-tracker/ https://www.thewrap.com/franchise-fatigue-tracker/#respond Sun, 27 Aug 2017 17:50:49 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1697056 Last summer, not a single summer blockbuster sequel was about to outperform its predecessors at the box office. This year, the summer box office did even worse, but the state of the sequel was more of a mixed bag. Let’s look at which summer movies this year will return in the future, and which ones might have reached their end.

“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”: $862 Million ($389 Domestic)

Previous installment: “Guardians of the Galaxy”: $773 Million ($333 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: YES. “Vol. 3” was announced two weeks before the film’s release, and the Guardians will be a part of next year’s “Avengers: Infinity War”

“Alien: Covenant”: $232 million ($74 million domestic)

Previous Installment: “Prometheus” $403 million ($126 million)

Sequel?: JURY’S OUT: Director Ridley Scott has said in interviews that he has plans for more “Alien” films, but after “Covenant” made 43 percent less than “Prometheus,” 20th Century Fox has not announced another installment.

“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” $789 Million ($171 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “On Stranger Tides: $1.04 Billion ($241 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: JURY’S OUT: “Pirates 5” is by far the weakest grossing of the “Pirates” sequels, yet a post-credits scene teased a sixth. It comes down to whether Johnny Depp and the rest of the cast are game for another voyage, and whether Disney thinks the franchise’s growing interest in China outweighs its rapidly falling domestic numbers.

“Baywatch”: $177 Million ($58 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: UNLIKELY: Producer Beau Flynn said a sequel was being discussed, but that was before “Baywatch” contributed to the worst Memorial Day weekend box office since 1998 and required international markets to save it from “bomb” status.

“Wonder Woman” $800 Million ($404 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: YES: Of course the movie of the summer was going to get a sequel. “Wonder Woman 2” was officially announced at San Diego Comic-Con for a December 2019 release, and director Patty Jenkins is said to be close to a deal to return.

“Cars 3” $309 Million ($148 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Cars 2”: $562 Million ($191 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: PROBABLY: Even though “Cars 3” didn’t blow the box office away, it’s still a merchandising behemoth for Disney. Don’t be surprised if Pixar announces a “Cars 4” sometime in the future to introduce new characters…and new toys.

“Transformers: The Last Knight” $601 Million ($130 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Age of Extinction” $1.1 billion ($245 Million)

Sequel?: YES: A Bumblebee spinoff and “Transformers 6” are slated to roll out over the next two years, but after “The Last Knight” took a huge fall from its predecessors, it’s clear that this franchise has lost its critic-proof status. Paramount reported a budget of $217 million for this film. Don’t expect that for the next one.

“Despicable Me 3” $950 Million ($252 Million Domestic)

Previous Installments: “Despicable Me 2” $970 Million ($368 Million Domestic) and “Minions” $1.15 Billion ($336 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: YES: With a combined $3.5 Billion grossed between four films, “Despicable Me” is now the highest grossing animated franchise of all-time. That should continue with “Minions 2,” which is coming out in July 2020.

“Spider-Man: Homecoming” $726 Million ($315 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” $708 Million ($202 Million Domestic)

SEQUEL?: YES: A 2019 sequel is on the way, along with spinoffs “Venom” and “Silver and Black.” Now that Spidey has new life as a high schooler, Sony is going to take advantage of it for all it’s worth.

“War for the Planet of the Apes” $347 Million ($141 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” $710 Million ($208 Million Domestic)

SEQUEL?: JURY’S OUT: While critically acclaimed and managing to both provide a satisfying conclusion and leave room open for a fourth film, “War” has been the weakest of the three reboot “Planet of the Apes” films at the box office. With director Matt Reeves moving to WB to work on the next Batman film, Fox will likely need to find a new director if they want to green light a fourth “Apes” film that continues the story after Caesar’s role in it ends.

“Girls Trip” $115 Million ($105 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

SEQUEL?: PROBABLY: “Girls Trip” is the only comedy with over $100 million, and it only cost $19 million to make. Stars Queen Latifah and Tiffany Haddish have said they would gladly make a sequel, so all it needs is the ok from Universal.

“Annabelle: Creation”: $166 Million ($68 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Annabelle” $256 Million ($84 Million Domestic) and “The Conjuring 2” $320 Million ($102 Million)

SEQUEL?: PROBABLY: This “Annabelle” prequel has pushed the “Conjuring” universe past $1 billion in combined grosses. Horror franchises always produce sequels until the wheels fall off, and that isn’t coming anytime soon for this creepy doll.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Alien: Covenant,

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https://www.thewrap.com/franchise-fatigue-tracker/feed/ 0 Last summer, not a single summer blockbuster sequel was about to outperform its predecessors at the box office. This year, the summer box office did even worse, but the state of the sequel was more of a mixed bag. Let's look at which summer movies this year will return in the future, and which ones might have reached their end.

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Last summer, not a single summer blockbuster sequel was about to outperform its predecessors at the box office. This year, the summer box office did even worse, but the state of the sequel was more of a mixed bag. Let's look at which summer movies this year will return in the future, and which ones might have reached their end.

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“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”: $862 Million ($389 Domestic)

Previous installment: “Guardians of the Galaxy”: $773 Million ($333 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: YES. “Vol. 3” was announced two weeks before the film’s release, and the Guardians will be a part of next year’s “Avengers: Infinity War.” 

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“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”: $862 Million ($389 Domestic)

Previous installment: “Guardians of the Galaxy”: $773 Million ($333 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: YES. “Vol. 3” was announced two weeks before the film’s release, and the Guardians will be a part of next year’s “Avengers: Infinity War.” 

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"King Arthur: Legend of the Sword": $146 Million ($39 Million Worldwide)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: NO: "King Arthur" was weaved as an origin tale for possible future Arthurian tales, but it ended up being one of this summer's biggest bombs, as it failed to recoup its $175 million budget. 

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"King Arthur: Legend of the Sword": $146 Million ($39 Million Worldwide)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: NO: "King Arthur" was weaved as an origin tale for possible future Arthurian tales, but it ended up being one of this summer's biggest bombs, as it failed to recoup its $175 million budget. 

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“Alien: Covenant”: $232 million ($74 million domestic)

Previous Installment: “Prometheus” $403 million ($126 million)

Sequel?: JURY’S OUT: Director Ridley Scott has said in interviews that he has plans for more “Alien” films, but after “Covenant” made 43 percent less than “Prometheus,” 20th Century Fox has not announced another installment. 

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“Alien: Covenant”: $232 million ($74 million domestic)

Previous Installment: “Prometheus” $403 million ($126 million)

Sequel?: JURY’S OUT: Director Ridley Scott has said in interviews that he has plans for more “Alien” films, but after “Covenant” made 43 percent less than “Prometheus,” 20th Century Fox has not announced another installment. 

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“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” $789 Million ($171 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “On Stranger Tides: $1.04 Billion ($241 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: JURY’S OUT: “Pirates 5” is by far the weakest grossing of the “Pirates” sequels, yet a post-credits scene teased a sixth. It comes down to whether Johnny Depp and the rest of the cast are game for another voyage, and whether Disney thinks the franchise’s growing interest in China outweighs its rapidly falling domestic numbers. 

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“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” $789 Million ($171 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “On Stranger Tides: $1.04 Billion ($241 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: JURY’S OUT: “Pirates 5” is by far the weakest grossing of the “Pirates” sequels, yet a post-credits scene teased a sixth. It comes down to whether Johnny Depp and the rest of the cast are game for another voyage, and whether Disney thinks the franchise’s growing interest in China outweighs its rapidly falling domestic numbers. 

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“Baywatch”: $177 Million ($58 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: UNLIKELY: Producer Beau Flynn said a sequel was being discussed, but that was before “Baywatch” contributed to the worst Memorial Day weekend box office since 1998 and required international markets to save it from “bomb” status. 

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“Baywatch”: $177 Million ($58 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: UNLIKELY: Producer Beau Flynn said a sequel was being discussed, but that was before “Baywatch” contributed to the worst Memorial Day weekend box office since 1998 and required international markets to save it from “bomb” status. 

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“Wonder Woman” $806 Million ($406 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: YES: Of course the movie of the summer was going to get a sequel. “Wonder Woman 2” was officially announced at San Diego Comic-Con for a December 2019 release, and director Patty Jenkins is said to be close to a deal to return. 

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“Wonder Woman” $806 Million ($406 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

Sequel?: YES: Of course the movie of the summer was going to get a sequel. “Wonder Woman 2” was officially announced at San Diego Comic-Con for a December 2019 release, and director Patty Jenkins is said to be close to a deal to return. 

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“Cars 3” $324 Million ($149 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Cars 2”: $562 Million ($191 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: PROBABLY: Even though “Cars 3” didn’t blow the box office away, it’s still a merchandising behemoth for Disney. Don’t be surprised if Pixar announces a “Cars 4” sometime in the future to introduce new characters…and new toys. 

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“Cars 3” $324 Million ($149 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Cars 2”: $562 Million ($191 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: PROBABLY: Even though “Cars 3” didn’t blow the box office away, it’s still a merchandising behemoth for Disney. Don’t be surprised if Pixar announces a “Cars 4” sometime in the future to introduce new characters…and new toys. 

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“Transformers: The Last Knight” $603 Million ($130 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Age of Extinction” $1.1 billion ($245 Million)

Sequel?: YES: A Bumblebee spinoff and “Transformers 6” are slated to roll out over the next two years, but after “The Last Knight” took a huge fall from its predecessors, it’s clear that this franchise has lost its critic-proof status. Paramount reported a budget of $217 million for this film. Don’t expect that for the next one. 

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“Transformers: The Last Knight” $603 Million ($130 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Age of Extinction” $1.1 billion ($245 Million)

Sequel?: YES: A Bumblebee spinoff and “Transformers 6” are slated to roll out over the next two years, but after “The Last Knight” took a huge fall from its predecessors, it’s clear that this franchise has lost its critic-proof status. Paramount reported a budget of $217 million for this film. Don’t expect that for the next one. 

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“Despicable Me 3” $971 Million ($254 Million Domestic)

Previous Installments: “Despicable Me 2” $970 Million ($368 Million Domestic) and “Minions” $1.15 Billion ($336 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: YES: With a combined $3.5 Billion grossed between four films, “Despicable Me” is now the highest grossing animated franchise of all-time. That should continue with “Minions 2,” which is coming out in July 2020.

 

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“Despicable Me 3” $971 Million ($254 Million Domestic)

Previous Installments: “Despicable Me 2” $970 Million ($368 Million Domestic) and “Minions” $1.15 Billion ($336 Million Domestic)

Sequel?: YES: With a combined $3.5 Billion grossed between four films, “Despicable Me” is now the highest grossing animated franchise of all-time. That should continue with “Minions 2,” which is coming out in July 2020.

 

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“Spider-Man: Homecoming” $737 Million ($318 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” $708 Million ($202 Million Domestic)

SEQUEL?: YES: A 2019 sequel is on the way, along with spinoffs “Venom” and “Silver and Black.” Now that Spidey has new life as a high schooler, Sony is going to take advantage of it for all it’s worth.

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“Spider-Man: Homecoming” $737 Million ($318 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” $708 Million ($202 Million Domestic)

SEQUEL?: YES: A 2019 sequel is on the way, along with spinoffs “Venom” and “Silver and Black.” Now that Spidey has new life as a high schooler, Sony is going to take advantage of it for all it’s worth.

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“War for the Planet of the Apes” $347 Million ($141 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” $710 Million ($208 Million Domestic)

SEQUEL?: JURY’S OUT: While critically acclaimed and managing to both provide a satisfying conclusion and leave room open for a fourth film, “War” has been the weakest of the three reboot “Planet of the Apes” films at the box office. With director Matt Reeves moving to WB to work on the next Batman film, Fox will likely need to find a new director if they want to green light a fourth “Apes” film that continues the story after Caesar’s role in it ends. 

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“War for the Planet of the Apes” $347 Million ($141 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” $710 Million ($208 Million Domestic)

SEQUEL?: JURY’S OUT: While critically acclaimed and managing to both provide a satisfying conclusion and leave room open for a fourth film, “War” has been the weakest of the three reboot “Planet of the Apes” films at the box office. With director Matt Reeves moving to WB to work on the next Batman film, Fox will likely need to find a new director if they want to green light a fourth “Apes” film that continues the story after Caesar’s role in it ends. 

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“Girls Trip” $120 Million ($108 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

SEQUEL?: PROBABLY: “Girls Trip” is the only comedy with over $100 million, and it only cost $19 million to make. Stars Queen Latifah and Tiffany Haddish have said they would gladly make a sequel, so all it needs is the ok from Universal. 

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“Girls Trip” $120 Million ($108 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

SEQUEL?: PROBABLY: “Girls Trip” is the only comedy with over $100 million, and it only cost $19 million to make. Stars Queen Latifah and Tiffany Haddish have said they would gladly make a sequel, so all it needs is the ok from Universal. 

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"The Dark Tower" $88 Million ($45 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

SEQUEL?: UNLIKELY: With poor reviews and tepid numbers, a "Dark Tower" sequel is unlikely. But MRC is pushing forward with a TV series that will continue the story.

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"The Dark Tower" $88 Million ($45 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: N/A

SEQUEL?: UNLIKELY: With poor reviews and tepid numbers, a "Dark Tower" sequel is unlikely. But MRC is pushing forward with a TV series that will continue the story.

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“Annabelle: Creation”: $215 Million ($78 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Annabelle” $256 Million ($84 Million Domestic) and “The Conjuring 2” $320 Million ($102 Million)

SEQUEL?: PROBABLY: This “Annabelle” prequel has pushed the “Conjuring” universe past $1 billion in combined grosses. Horror franchises always produce sequels until the wheels fall off, and that isn’t coming anytime soon for this creepy doll.

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“Annabelle: Creation”: $215 Million ($78 Million Domestic)

Previous Installment: “Annabelle” $256 Million ($84 Million Domestic) and “The Conjuring 2” $320 Million ($102 Million)

SEQUEL?: PROBABLY: This “Annabelle” prequel has pushed the “Conjuring” universe past $1 billion in combined grosses. Horror franchises always produce sequels until the wheels fall off, and that isn’t coming anytime soon for this creepy doll.

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‘It’ Box Office Predictions Balloon to Record-Bursting $60 Million Opening https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-predictions-balloon-record-bursting-60-million-opening/ https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-predictions-balloon-record-bursting-60-million-opening/#respond Thu, 24 Aug 2017 20:47:39 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1696942 Box office trackers are extremely bullish on Warner Bros./New Line’s “It,” saying the horror film will bring good news to a movie industry in great need following a miserable August.

Last week, the first round of tracking had the remake of Stephen King’s seminal horror tale making $50 million in its opening weekend. Now, those numbers have floated up to $60 million, a figure that would give “It” the biggest theatrical debut in horror movie history as well as the biggest opening for any film released in September.

The record currently belongs to “Hannibal,” which made $58 million in its opening weekend in 2001. Second on the list is “Paranormal Activity 3,” which made a $52.5 million opening  in 2011. The September record belongs to “Hotel Transylvania 2” with $48.4 million in 2015.

What would make this new record particularly impressive is the film’s R rating, which, aside from the films listed above, tend to weigh down a horror film’s box office performance. Aside from “Hannibal” and “Paranormal Activity 3,” there are no horror films among the top 25 biggest R-rated openings. To find another horror film, you have to go down to No. 33 on the list, which is held by “The Conjuring” with $41.8 million.

Because of its rating and release slot, studio sources at WB say they’re remaining cautious about the tracking numbers and would consider an opening over $35 million a success. That would match the performance set by the “Conjuring” films, which last week passed $1 billion in combined box office business.

But the terrifying trailers for “It,” which feature Bill Skarsgard as the infamous Pennywise the Clown, have become viral hits on YouTube, with the teaser trailer currently holding 31 million views. That early hype has only snowballed as the summer has gone on, and a strong critical reception could cement its status as fright-filled hit.

“It” arrives in theaters Sept. 8.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'It' VR Experience Lets You Float Through the Sewers of Derry With Pennywise (Video)

See New Pennywise Image From 'It': 'It's Weird All the Time' (Photos)

Pennywise Will Terrify You for More Than 2 Hours When 'It' Hits Theaters

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Why ‘Logan Lucky’ Became 2017’s Best Reviewed Box Office Flop https://www.thewrap.com/why-logan-lucky-best-reviewed-box-office-flop/ https://www.thewrap.com/why-logan-lucky-best-reviewed-box-office-flop/#respond Sun, 20 Aug 2017 23:16:52 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1694626 Steven Soderbergh hoped to revolutionize movie distribution with a radical plan for cheaper, more targeted marketing on the Daniel Craig-Channing Tatum heist thriller “Logan Lucky.”

But like the onscreen heist things didn’t go according to plan. Despite earning a 93 percent “Fresh” rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes, the film opened with just $8 million from 3,035 screens, finishing a disappointing third at a weak box office.

That is by far the lowest opening among the 10 wide-release films that have received a “Fresh” rating of 90 percent or higher on Rotten Tomato’s Tomatometer this year.

Soderbergh’s eagerly awaited return to movies had many things going for it. Produced at a reasonable $29 million budget, the film starred two talented leads, Tatum and Adam Driver, as two brothers in a rollicking heist to steal millions from Charlotte Motor Speedway.

Joining them was a cast that included Seth MacFarlane, Riley Keough, Hilary Swank, and James Bond himself, Daniel Craig, the latter of whom played a grizzled career thief with a knack for blowing things up. Reviews hailed director Steven Soderbergh for coming out of a brief retirement to make a popcorn flick that’s smarter than it looks. Yet it has failed to light a spark commercially, so what happened?

Most box office duds misfire for several reasons. But for “Logan Lucky,” there is one clear explanation: The film failed to raise awareness with audiences, and that’s due in large part to an ambitious attempt by Soderbergh to promote the film on a thrifty marketing budget. Unfortunately, the plan didn’t work out the way it was supposed to.

In interviews about his return to filmmaking, Soderbergh spoke extensively about his frustration with Hollywood, particularly how studios overspend on marketing and then take a large slice of the box office to make up the cost.

Looking to change this with “Logan Lucky,” he came up with a plan with producer and former Warner Bros. distribution exec Dan llmllman to promote the film on a budget less than what they spent to make the film with the hopes that the lion’s share of the box office would go to Soderbergh and the cast.

In a deal made with Bleecker Street (which is co-distributing with Soderbergh’s Fingerprint Releasing), “Logan Lucky” would only market the movie with money from post-theatrical distribution deals such as its streaming deal with Amazon, while foreign pre-sales would fund the production budget. In total, about $20 million was scraped together for marketing, far smaller than the budgets given even for micro budget films like those from Jason Blum’s Blumhouse.

That budget would be used to target demographics whose walks of life matched those of the characters depicted in the film. The first trailer made its debut on Memorial Day weekend during NASCAR’s Coca-Cola 600, the race during which the heist in the movie takes place.

Marketing also targeted regions of the country where NASCAR is most popular, specifically the South and Midwest, rather than major coastal markets. Instead of a fancy red carpet premiere in Hollywood, a more subdued advance charity screening was held for fans in Knoxville.

Arguably the most prominent promotion the film received was Daniel Craig’s appearance on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” last week, though any jokes Craig might have shared with Colbert about playing a thief with a thick Southern accent were overshadowed by Craig making it official that he was coming back to make one more James Bond movie.

In exchange for marketing and distributing the film, Bleecker Street received a minimum fee of less than $1 million instead of a fixed cut of 10-15 percent of the box office.

If the box office returns reach certain thresholds, Bleecker Street would then receive a portion of the profits on top of the minimum fee, with their slice of the pie growing with each threshold crossed. Soderbergh said that this model lowered the bar “Logan Lucky” needed to clear to make the film profitable, estimating that a $15 million opening would be considered a win.

“All these people who work for scale to make this film will literally be able to go online with a password and look at this account as the money is delivered from the theaters,” he told GQ. “So it’s complete transparency. The question is: Can we put a movie out in 3,000 theaters, and spend half of what a studio would spend to do it, and succeed?”

With an opening that is barely more than half of that $15 million goal, the answer seems to be no, but the decision to go with a cheap marketing plan wasn’t necessarily a bad one. While Blumhouse’s thrifty marketing strategies with Universal carry a bigger price tag than what “Logan Lucky” had, they are still cheaper than a lot of blockbusters and have continuously given the horror studio immense bang for their buck.

Perhaps more marketing in between the film’s Memorial Day weekend trailer release and the heavy regional marketing could have built more buzz for the film. As Exhibitor Relations analyst Jeff Bock told TheWrap last week when discussing this summer’s box office duds, “The real success comes with coming into theaters with a lot of hype and then having the reviews to back it up,”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Wonder Woman' Passes Original 'Spider-Man' at Box Office, Reaches $800 Million Worldwide

'Logan Lucky' Review: Steven Soderbergh Returns With Well-Oiled Heist Flick

'Patti Cake$' Disappoints While 'Wind River' Opens Solid at Indie Box Office

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‘It’ Remake to Scare Away Box Office Slump With Record $50 Million Opening https://www.thewrap.com/it-remake-box-office-record/ https://www.thewrap.com/it-remake-box-office-record/#respond Thu, 17 Aug 2017 20:06:22 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1693386 As the return of the dreaded Pennywise draws near for Warner Bros./New Line’s remake of Stephen King’s novel “It,” box office trackers are projecting a very strong opening that should continue what has been a great 2017 for horror blockbusters.

Trackers have the remake on course for a $50-55 million opening from its early September release frame.

If that range is reached, it would give “It” the record for the biggest September opening in box office history, passing the $48 million made by “Hotel Transylvania 2.”

But while “It” has enjoyed immense buzz since the teaser trailer first dropped back in March, there is reason to curb one’s enthusiasm. For one, “It” has an R rating, and $50 million is a threshold that almost no R-rated horror film has been able to reach. The rare film that pulled it off was “Paranormal Activity 3,” which made $52.5 million in 2011. Two PG-13 horror films, “The Village” and “Van Helsing,” also hit the $50 million mark in 2004.

But while low budget horror has produced several critical and commercial hits in recent years, none have reached this mark. Even Universal and Blumhouse’s two big PG-13 horror hits, “Get Out” and “Split,” didn’t come close to this mark in their openings, making a (still impressive) $33 million and $40 million respectively. Last week’s big horror release: “Annabelle: Creation,” came up with a $35 million opening, while its 2014 predecessor made $40 million.

If “It” manages to blow by all of these figures, it could provide a big boost not only for the September box office, but for October as well, as the strong opening could be followed with repeat viewings from audiences looking for a scare at Halloween. Even if the movie falls short, a $35-40 million opening would put in on the level of the “Annabelle” and “Conjuring” films will be a victory for WB and New Line.

“It” tells the story of seven children in the small town of Derry, Maine, who are hunted by the titular creature who hides in the town’s sewers and takes the form of an insidious clown named Pennywise to terrorize the children.

Played by Tim Curry in the famous 1990 miniseries, Pennywise is played in the new film by Bill Skarsgard, with Jaeden Lieberher (“Midnight Special”) and Finn Wolfhard (“Stranger Things”) leading the cast of kids trying to stop the evil threat. Andrés Muschietti is directing from a screenplay by Chase Palmer, Cary Fukunaga, and Gary Dauberman.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Every Stephen King Easter Egg in 'The Dark Tower' (Photos)

'The Dark Tower' Review: Big Screen Adaptation of Stephen King's Gunslinger Epic Misfires

'It' Terrifies in New Trailer of Stephen King Adaptation (Video)

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‘Hitman’s Bodyguard’ and ‘Logan Lucky’ Unlikely to Boost Box Office This Weekend https://www.thewrap.com/hitmans-bodyguard-logan-lucky-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/hitmans-bodyguard-logan-lucky-box-office/#respond Wed, 16 Aug 2017 01:50:16 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1691965 Can Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson bring moviegoers back to theaters this weekend? What about Daniel Craig with a thick Southern accent? Based on the tracking for Lionsgate’s “The Hitman’s Bodyguard” and Bleecker Street/Fingerprint’s “Logan Lucky,” the answer seems to be “not likely.”

Independent trackers are projecting “Hitman’s Bodyguard” to have the bigger weekend with $17-20 million from 3,350 screens, with Lionsgate projecting a $15 million opening. The action comedy was first screened at CinemaCon back in the spring, with Lionsgate heavily promoting Reynolds and Jackson’s lead performances as a team up between two Marvel movie veterans. But critics who have submitted early reviews haven’t all been sold on the Nick Fury/Deadpool alliance, as the film currently has a 50 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes with 16 reviews submitted.

“Logan Lucky,” meanwhile, has received much better critical reception with a running score of 94 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, but is currently tracking for an opening of $7-9 million from 2,500 screens against a reported budget of $29 million. Marketing for “Logan Lucky” has been lower than one might expect for a film with several recognizable stars including Channing Tatum, Adam Driver, and the aforementioned Daniel Craig. But this is due in large part to director Steven Soderbergh, who previously announced his retirement after making his last film, “Side Effects” in 2013, but came back to make this heist comedy.

In an interview with The New York Times, Soderbergh says he devised a model with former Warner Bros. exec Dan Fellman that allowed them to reach a deal with Bleecker Street. In it, the marketing budget would be largely restricted to funds earned from post-theatrical distribution sales (Amazon, airlines, HBO, etc.). Bleecker Street would receive a small fee for distributing the film and would only receive a portion of the box office if the film reaches certain thresholds.

Soderbergh explained that with this model, an opening weekend of $15 million would be considered a success, but if trackers are any indication, “Logan Lucky” will have to beat industry expectations to hit that target. Bleecker Street will be looking for strong turnout from the Southeast U.S., where the film takes place and where it will have extra appeal with NASCAR as a major plot point and several top drivers like Carl Edwards, Kyle Busch, and Brad Keselowski making surprise, Stan Lee-esque cameos throughout.

“Logan Lucky” stars Tatum and Driver as two down-on-their-luck brothers who, along with fugitive career thief Joe Bang (Craig), hatch a plan to steal $14 million from Charlotte Motor Speedway during the Coca-Cola 600, the longest race on the NASCAR schedule. The film also stars Seth McFarlane, Riley Keough, Katie Holmes, Katherine Waterston, and Hilary Swank. Tatum is producing with Reid Carolin, Mark Johnson, and Gregory Jacobs.

“The Hitman’s Bodyguard” features Ryan Reynolds as a federal agent tasked with guarding the life of Darius Kincaid, a top hitman who just happens to be his mortal enemy (Jackson). After locking horns, they reluctantly work together to stop a power-hungry Eastern European dictator (Gary Oldman) with the help of Darius’ equally infamous wife, Sonia (Salma Hayek). Patrick Hughes directed the film from a script by Tom O’Connor. Producers are David Ellison, Mark Gill, Dana Goldberg, Matthew O’Toole, John Thompson, and Les Weldon.

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Box Office Bummer: Why Movie Theater Companies Like AMC Just Lost $1.3 Billion https://www.thewrap.com/why-movie-theater-companies-amc-just-lost-1-billion/ https://www.thewrap.com/why-movie-theater-companies-amc-just-lost-1-billion/#respond Thu, 10 Aug 2017 00:15:35 +0000 Matt Pressberg https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1688852 Last week, AMC Theatres fired the shot heard ’round the popcorn machine  — and erased more than $1.3 billion in market value for the four biggest movie theater chains in North America.

AMC, which has been aggressively buying up cinema chains and adding recliners and fancy food options to its theaters, announced plans on August 1 to cut costs and previewed brutal second-quarter earnings. After a profit of 7 cents a share in the first quarter, the world’s largest exhibitor reported a massive loss of $1.35 a share.

That sent the company’s stock plunging more than 25 percent — and signaled trouble for the entire exhibition industry. Weak box office proved to a drain for Regal, Cinemark and Canadian chain Cineplex as well. All three reported disappointing second quarter revenues and all saw their share prices ‏drop, though not as a steep AMC’s.

What went wrong?

1. Blockbuster drought

Second-quarter box office was down 1 percent compared to last year — with hits like Warner Bros.’ “Wonder Woman” failing to match last summer’s string of global blockbusters like Disney/Pixar’s “Finding Dory,” Disney/Marvel’s “Captain America: Civil War” or Disney’s “The Jungle Book.”

And the next three months look brutal compared to last year’s $2.95 billion-grossing third quarter — including Universal’s “The Secret Life of Pets” and Warner Bros. “Suicide Squad,” which each grossed more than $300 million domestically, as well as surprise hits like Sony’s “Sausage Party” and Sony/Screen Gems’ “Lights Out.”

Through August 9 this year, the third quarter box office has added up to just $838 million — and the upcoming release schedule is pretty bare as far as guaranteed nine-figure films.

2. Debt-fueled dealmaking

The box office slowdown comes at a particularly bad time for AMC in particular. The company made three separate billion-dollar acquisitions last year, picking up U.S. exhibitor Carmike and European chains Odeon & UCI and Nordic.

As a result, AMC has about $4.9 billion in total debt as of June 30 — and it is now pausing acquisitions to try to reduce that burden.

3. High overhead

AMC plans to cut staff and introduce strategic pricing to help fill seats. “The company has embarked on a domestic cost reduction and revenue enhancement plan to better align operating expenses with theatre attendance in its markets and reduce general and administrative costs for the balance of 2017 and into 2018,” AMC said in an August 1 release.

In addition, AMC and Regal recently agreed to sell Open Road Films, the distributor of Best Picture winner “Spotlight” co-owned by the two exhibitors, to Tang Media Partners. The goal: shedding more non-core assets. (The companies previously announced that the venture had cost them each $49 million in losses.)

4. It’s a cyclical business

While domestic box office is down 4 percent from a record-breaking 2016 at this point, it’s flat compared to 2015 and up from 2014.

And even if the third quarter proves to be lackluster, the movie business has a way of delivering twists. Most people didn’t expect much from horror film last winter’s “Don’t Breathe,” but it rolled to nearly $90 million domestically on a sub-$10 million budget.

Disney/Marvel’s “Thor: Ragnarok” should get things back on track in November, and the year ends with a new “Star Wars” film, which could be the savior the cinema world needs.

“The Force Awakens” pushed the 2015 box office over the $11 billion mark and helped it set a new record when it looked like a much longer shot just weeks before. Can “The Last Jedi” save 2017’s bacon? Theater chains sure hope the Force will be with them.

Related stories from TheWrap:

AMC Theatres CEO Says 'Acquisitions Are Paused' to Reduce Debt

AMC Entertainment Reports Brutal Q2 Earnings As Summer Box Office Slumps

AMC Theatres Slashes Costs to Deal With Box Office Slump, Stock Plunges 25 Percent

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‘Annabelle: Creation’ Set to Topple ‘Dark Tower’ at Weekend Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/annabelle-creation-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/annabelle-creation-box-office/#respond Wed, 09 Aug 2017 19:04:21 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1688542 This past weekend, “The Dark Tower” took in $19.5 million in its opening, the lowest No. 1 total since a third-week “Split” took the top spot with $14 million back in February, and the lowest No. 1 opening since the $13.3 million made by “Chappie” in March 2015. That means that the top spot at the box office is wide open, and Warner Bros./New Line’s horror film “Annabelle: Creation” is looking to take that spot.

Independent trackers have the “Annabelle” prequel making $27-30 million from 3,502 screens this weekend, with WB projecting slightly lower at $25 million. The film is in position to make a solid profit with a production budget of $15 million and a lack of competition in the horror market until the release of “It,” another WB release produced by New Line. As Blumhouse has demonstrated, low-budget horror is proving to be a low-risk/high-reward genre that’s performing well at the box office, and Warner Bros. will be looking to reap its potential in the coming weeks with this installment in James Wan’s “Conjuring” franchise and a remake of one of the most famous Stephen King adaptations. The first “Annabelle,” which was released in October 2014, made Halloween bucks with a $37.1 million opening against a $6.5 million budget. It went on to gross $84 million domestic and $256.8 million worldwide.

“Annabelle: Creation” follows up on the first “Annabelle” by showing the origins of the titular evil doll as it terrorizes a group of orphaned girls who take shelter in the house of the doll’s creator. The film is directed by David F. Sandberg from a script by Gary Dauberman, with James Wan and Peter Safran producing.

Also in wide release this week is Open Road’s “The Nut Job 2,” which is projecting for a $15-17 million opening from 4,003 screens. Studio projections are set at $12-13 million. The first “Nut Job” was panned by critics in 2014 with a 10 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and a score for this sequel has yet to be entered. The film stars Will Arnett, Katherine Heigl, Jackie Chan, and Maya Rudolph. Cal Brunker directed the film and co-wrote it with Bob Barlen and Scott Bindley. Barlen, Harry Linden, and Sunghwan Kim are producers.

Finally, there’s Lionsgate’s “The Glass Castle,” which is getting a targeted release of 1,400 screens and is projecting for an opening of around $5 million. Based on the best-selling memoirs of Jeannette Walls, the film stars Brie Larson as the author as she struggles to form her own life for herself while growing up in poverty with an alcoholic father (Woody Harrelson) and an eccentric mother (Naomi Watts). Destin Daniel Cretton is directing from a script he co-wrote with Andrew Lanham and Marti Noxon. Gil Netter and Ken Kao are producers.

NOTE: A previous version of this story noted that “The Dark Tower” had the lowest No. 1 total of 2017. This has been corrected. 

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'Wind River' Hits Bullseye in Limited Opening at Indie Box Office

AMC Entertainment Reports Brutal Q2 Earnings As Summer Box Office Slumps

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‘Get Out’ Is 2017’s Most Profitable Film So Far https://www.thewrap.com/get-out-split-box-office-return-investment-2017/ https://www.thewrap.com/get-out-split-box-office-return-investment-2017/#respond Fri, 04 Aug 2017 00:10:03 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1686080 Jordan Peele’s racism-horror masterpiece “Get Out” has had the best return on investment of any film of 2017 — a spectacular 630 percent.

Deep into summer, only one other film this year has come close to that kind of return — and it’s from Blumhouse, the same production company that delivered “Get Out.” M. Night Shyamalan‘s “Split” had a 610 percent ROI.

TheWrap calculated an estimate for the combined production budget and marketing costs for the top 25 grossing films this year so far, and Blumhouse founder and CEO Jason Blum’s strategy of taking creative risks within tight budgets is paying off.

Peele was given a $4.5 million budget to work with on “Get Out,” while M. Night Shyamalan had $9 million to make “Split.” Combined with an estimated $30 million marketing budget, that gives “Get Out” an ROI percentage of 630 percent with its worldwide gross of $252 million, and “Split” an ROI of 610 percent on a global haul of $277 million.

Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” remake, which remains the highest grossing film of the year so far with $1.26 billion worldwide, had a lower ROI than “Get Out” or “Split” because of its $160 million budget and much more extensive global marketing campaign. Its ROI is well over 400 percent, but doesn’t approach that of the two Blumhouse films.

Overall, summer box office is down from 2016, despite big studio successes including “Despicable Me 3,” “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” and “Wonder Woman.”

Those films, unlike “Get Out” and “Split,” can earn separate revenue from merchandise. Many people want a Minions doll from “Despicable Me,” but few would want a tea with the “Get Out” logo — unless they have a very twisted mind.

Other factors in Blumhouse’s ROI:Blumhouse has a distribution deal with Universal that gets its films on thousands of screens. The films didn’t have Chinese releases, which helped keep overseas distribution costs down. And the films benefitted from strong social media recommendations and word of mouth, a testimony to how much they pleased audiences.

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The next Universal/Blumhouse horror film, a “Groundhog Day”-esque slasher mystery called “Happy Death Day,” will be released on October 13. It imagines a young woman reliving the same finale day, again and again.

Blumhouse probably wouldn’t mind re-living its successful 2017.

Check back for TheWrap’s look at other film’s with strong 2017 ROI.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Norman Lear Sings the Praises of Jordan Peele's 'Get Out': 'I've Never Been More Touched'

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Reflections on 'Get Out': The Shock of Racial Truth Served Up Till It Hurts

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July Box Office Down Despite ‘Spider-Man’ and ‘Planet of the Apes’ https://www.thewrap.com/july-box-office-down-8-percent/ https://www.thewrap.com/july-box-office-down-8-percent/#respond Tue, 01 Aug 2017 00:54:18 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1683971 Movie theaters were full of critically-praised films in July.

From franchise titles like “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “War for the Planet of the Apes” to original releases like “Baby Driver,” “The Big Sick,” and “Dunkirk,” moviegoers had plenty of quality films to choose from. Unfortunately, that quality did not translate into a rebound for the domestic box office, as estimates from comScore show an eight percent year-to-year drop from 2016.

Estimates from comScore put this month’s totals at around $1.25 billion, compared to $1.37 billion for July 2016. Box office totals for the summer to the end of July were also down eight percent, with 2017 currently standing at $3.06 billion compared to $3.33 billion for 2016 from May to July. For a more even comparison, four weekends were counted in comScore’s tally, including Friday, June 30.

While July did see “Spider-Man: Homecoming” bring in $278 million after its release in the first weekend of the month, last year’s top moneymaker, Illumination’s “The Secret Life of Pets,” did even better with $296 million. Also boosting the July 2016 totals was “Finding Dory,” which made $139 million in July after being released in mid-June. While July 2017 had a strong family draw with “Despicable Me 3,” which made $230 million that month, the one-two punch of “Pets” and “Dory” couldn’t be matched by the likes of “War for the Planet of the Apes” and “Dunkirk,” which had openings in the $50 million range and strong word of mouth but didn’t have the “all ages allure” of those animated comedies.

“Apes” in particular has not performed as well as analysts had hoped, currently grossing $118 million domestic and $224 million worldwide against a $150 million budget. By comparison, “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” and “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” had domestic totals of $133.5 million and $172.4 million after three weekends in theaters. “War” received the best Rotten Tomatoes score in “Planet of the Apes” history with 94 percent and an A- on CinemaScore to boot. But while “Rise” was released in August 2011 against “The Help” and “Dawn” was released in July 2014 against a three-week-old “Transformers” sequel, “War” faced a recently released “Spider-Man” and the enduring “Wonder Woman.” On top of facing those superhero films and their more crowd-pleasing approach, the latest “Apes” sported intense war sequences and dark existential themes, which might have deterred audiences looking for a more fun time at the movies.

On top of the downtick for July, the outlook for August doesn’t look good either. While August 2016 had “Suicide Squad” to provide at least one strong opening weekend, August 2017 will start with “The Dark Tower,” which is currently projecting for an opening in the low $20 million range, and “Detroit,” which has received critical acclaim with a 95 percent Rotten Tomatoes rating but is definitely more for the art house crowd than a wide audience with its unflinching depiction of racially-charged violence. In fact, while there’s a chance for some mid-budget surprises this month with films like “Logan Lucky” and “The Hitman’s Bodyguard,” the box office is unlikely to see a huge opening weekend until the second week of September, when New Line’s remake of the Stephen King horror “It” hits screens.

Fortunately, the strong results from February and March have helped annual box office totals keep up with last year. Thanks to films like “Beauty and the Beast,” “Fate of the Furious,” and “Get Out,” the first seven months of 2017 have a combined gross of $6.81 billion, compared to $6.9 billion last year. Even as summer numbers continue to slide, films like “Thor: Ragnarok” and “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” should give 2017 a chance to beat last year’s grosses as the 52-week release slate continues to make its presence felt.

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Will ‘Dunkirk’ Stay Afloat Against ‘Atomic Blonde,’ ‘Emoji Movie’ at Box Office This Weekend? https://www.thewrap.com/dunkirk-atomic-blonde-emoji-movie-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/dunkirk-atomic-blonde-emoji-movie-box-office/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2017 21:38:40 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1680522 After beating tracker expectations with a $50.5 million opening, “Dunkirk” will try to continue Christopher Nolan’s success in holdover weekends as Focus Features’ spy flick “Atomic Blonde” and Columbia/Sony Animation’s “The Emoji Movie” enter theaters to close out July.

As was the case with “Girls Trip” and “Valerian” last weekend, “Dunkirk” will be competing against films with different primary demographics, so it will likely come down to how well “Dunkirk” can keep drawing older audiences while “Emoji Movie” targets kids enjoying summer break and “Atomic Blonde” aims for 18 to 34 audiences, both male and female.

If “Dunkirk” keeps its drop-off in between 50 percent and 60 percent — something that, incidentally, “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “War for the Planet of the Apes” were unable to do in their second frame — it will be right in the range independent trackers have set for both new releases. “Atomic Blonde” is currently tracking at roughly $20 million, give or take, for its opening weekend from 3,300 screens, while “Emoji Movie” tracking is much more scattershot. The animated movie is looking to land atop $20 million, and will have beat most predictions if it cracks $30 million from 4,069 screens. Studios for both films are projecting $20 million.

Like last month’s thrifty action hit, “Baby Driver,” “Atomic Blonde” is trying to build off its strong reviews from its SXSW premiere and the reputation of its lead star, Charlize Theron, as one of the top action stars in Hollywood, following her show-stopping performances in “Mad Max: Fury Road” and “The Fate of the Furious.” Focus is heavily promoting Theron with a pull quote hailing her as a “female 007,” but when it comes to the numbers, a better comparison would be another dark, stylized shoot-em-up: 2014’s “John Wick.”

Three years ago, “John Wick,” which was co-directed by “Blonde” filmmaker David Leitch, rode strong word of mouth to a $14 million opening and a $43 million domestic cume against a $20 million budget. “Atomic Blonde,” with its $30 million budget, is aiming for a slightly higher number than that, and Theron could easily provide it. With “Wonder Woman” reigning as the movie of the summer and sci-fi fans abuzz about Jodie Whitaker becoming the first female Doctor on “Doctor Who,” the thirst to see women in gung-ho roles is stronger than ever. Theron contributed to that momentum with “Fury Road, and she could continue it here.

“The Emoji Movie” has a somewhat bigger price tag for Columbia Pictures, with a reported $50 million budget. This film ended up in Sony’s hands after an aggressive bidding war for its pitch two years ago between Sony Animation, Warner Bros., and Paramount. With Open Road’s “The Nut Job 2” serving as the only wide family release in August, Sony will be looking to have kids’ attention during the final weeks of summer break. The film’s overseas release starts next weekend with openings in Mexico and the U.K.

Based on the novel “The Coldest City” by Antony Johnston and Sam Hart, “Atomic Blonde” stars Charlize Theron as Lorraine Broughton, a MI6 agent sent to Berlin on the eve of German unification in 1989 to eliminate an agent-hunting espionage ring. Joining her is David Percival (James McAvoy), an MI6 station chief who forms a tenuous alliance with Broughton as bullets quickly start flying.

David Leitch directed this film from a screenplay by Kurt Johnstad. The film also stars John Goodman, Til Schweiger, Bill Skarsgard, and Sofia Boutella. Sierra/Affinity produced and financed the film, with Theron, Beth Kong, A.J. Dix, Kelly McCormick, Eric Gitter, and Peter Schwerin serving as producers. “Atomic Blonde” currently has a Rotten Tomatoes score of 79 percent.

“The Emoji Movie” stars T.J. Miller as Gene, an emoji who lives inside a teenager’s cellphone where emojis have jobs expressing a single emotion for their users. But when Gene realizes that he can’t do his job because he can express multiple emotions, he leaves his phone to try to become like everyone else. Anthony Leondis directed the film and co-wrote the script with Eric Siegel and Mike White, with Michelle Raimo Kouyate producing.The cast also includes James Corden, Ilana Glazer, Jennifer Coolidge, Patrick Stewart, and Maya Rudolph.

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EuropaCorp’s Stock Tanks After Luc Besson’s ‘Valerian’ Flops at Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/europacorp-stock-tanks-on-timid-valerian/ https://www.thewrap.com/europacorp-stock-tanks-on-timid-valerian/#respond Mon, 24 Jul 2017 15:38:14 +0000 Sean Burch https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1679778

French film studio EuropaCorp is licking its wounds on Monday after its stock cratered more than 8 percent following the paltry North American box-office performance of its latest release, “”Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets.”

The sci-fi action movie cost $180 million to produce and starred heavy-hitters like Rihanna, Clive Owen and Ethan Hawke — as well as Dane DeHaan and Cara Delevingne — but only pulled in an uninspiring $17 million at the North American box office this weekend.

EuropaCorp took a beating from the performance, with its shares falling to €3.54 (about $4.12) from an opening of €3.79 for the Paris-based movie maker.

STX Films was tapped by EuropaCorp to handle the release of “Valerian” in the U.S. after the disintegration of Relativity Media — a company with whom EuropaCorp had a joint distribution deal. EuropaCorp won’t take a big financial hit as it brought in outside investors and sold distribution rights to mitigate the cost of the big-budget movie.

Still, shareholders did not respond well to its poor performance on Monday, pushing its stock closer to its 52-week low of €3.14.

“Valerian” is set to release in more than 100 new territories in the near future — including France and the U.K. — but its timid opening in the North America and other major markets like Germany does not bode well for its prospects.

The futuristic crime-fighting movie was fifth at the cinema this weekend, trailing “Dunkirk,” “Girls Trip,” Spider-Man: Homecoming,”  and “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

EuropaCorp could’ve used anything but a flop from “Valerian,” with the company reporting a historically bad fiscal year, with nearly €120 million ($135 million) in losses.

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‘Dunkirk’ Looks to Turn Critical Acclaim Into Box Office Victory https://www.thewrap.com/dunkirk-box-office-preview/ https://www.thewrap.com/dunkirk-box-office-preview/#respond Thu, 20 Jul 2017 01:25:27 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1676074

The astritics seem to be in agreement: Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” is one of, if not the, best films of the year and a surefire Oscar contender, giving the World War II epic a “Fresh” rating of 96 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Now Warner Bros. will look to turn that critical acclaim into box office success.

Currently, “Dunkirk” is pegged by independent trackers for an opening weekend in the range of $30-40 million, with WB’s projections on the upper end of that range. The film will be released in 3,700 locations, which includes a variety of special formats including IMAX, 35mm, and 70mm film.

But there’s the chance that independent projections may be underestimating “Dunkirk’s” potential. Unlike many blockbusters, WWII movies tend to attract an older male audience that is not always represented in social media and could help push the opening for “Dunkirk” into the $40-50 million range. Even if it doesn’t, older audiences can help give”Dunkirk’s” box office haul legs, as older audiences tend to see films in later weeks.

“It can be hard for trackers to gauge this component of moviegoers, which isn’t as on the grid as much as their younger counterparts,” comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian says. “So ‘Dunkirk’ could surprise a lot of people.”

In addition, “Dunkirk” has enjoyed a social media buzz that no other film of its kind has received thanks to an unexpected periphery demographic: One Direction fans. Though Nolan has said he did not know of Harry Styles’ fame when he cast him as a British Army private, the presence of the former boy band star has caused the film to get a spike in social media interest with each new trailer release.

According to comScore’s PreAct social media charts, Dunkirk has been one of the top 3 most talked about upcoming releases for each of the past three weeks, sharing the top spots with intensely hyped franchise staples like “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “Avengers: Infinity War.” To date, “Dunkirk” has accumulated 1.35 million social media conversations on PreAct, making it the only summer movie outside of “Wonder Woman” and Disney-related IP to score above 1 million conversations on the system. While there’s no guarantee that Harry fans will become a major box office driver, it has helped “Dunkirk” keep up word-of-mouth even before this week’s glowing reviews rolled in and will make the demographic breakdowns a thing to look out for this weekend.

“Dunkirk” tells the story of the Dunkirk Evacuation, a famous moment from the early stages of World War II in which over 300,000 Allied soldiers were rescued after being surrounded by Nazi forces in Frances. Nolan is writer-director on the film, and produced it with his wife, Emma Thomas. The film’s cast includes Fionn Whitehead, Tom Hardy, Mark Rylance, Harry Styles, Kenneth Branagh, and Cillian Murphy.

Also releasing this weekend is Universal’s “Girls Trip,” which is trying to break the recent slump for adult comedies at the box office. Projections have the film becoming the first comedy of 2017 to post an opening above the $20 million mark with a range of $23-28 million. Universal is projecting a $20 million opening.

“Girls Trip” arrives three weeks after Will Ferrell’s most recent comedy, “The House,” became the actor’s lowest-grossing opening weekend in nearly 20 years with $9 million against a $40 million budget. Before that were other struggling comedies like “Rough Night” ($37 million worldwide cume/$20 million budget), “Snatched” ($59 million worldwide/$42 million budget) and “Baywatch,” which got bailed out thanks to solid overseas returns ($165 million worldwide/$69 million budget). The good news for “Girls Trip” is that it has enjoyed a far better critical reception than any of those films. After early reviews, the film currently has an 89 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes, and its star-studded cast, which includes Queen Latifah and Jada Pinkett Smith with cameos from Mariah Carey, Ne-Yo, and Gabrielle Union, has helped draw interest from female audiences.

“Girls Trip” stars Regina Hall, Jada Pinkett Smith, Queen Latifah, Tiffany Haddish as four lifelong friends who bond on a trip to New Orleans filled with both tender moments and wild partying. Malcolm D. Lee directed the film from a script by Kenya Barris and Tracy Oliver, and produced the film with Will Packer.

Finally, there’s STX/EuropaCorp’s “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets,” which may be the biggest gamble of the summer season. Projections have the film making $18-22 million in its opening weekend against a reported $150 million budget. That means the film will need a strong performance from Europe, where the graphic novel the film is adapted from, “Valerian and Laureline,” is more well-known.

It wouldn’t be the first time writer-director Luc Besson has seen one of his films underperform in the States but thrive across the Atlantic. Arguably his most famous film, 1997’s “The Fifth Element, took 75 percent of its total worldwide cume from overseas with $200 million. But “Dunkirk” will provide tougher competition in Europe,  at least in the U.K., where “Dunkirk” enjoys the advantage of having an extremely popular cast and director. “Valerian” will also not enjoy the premium screening push that “Dunkirk” will get, as IMAX provided Nolan and his team with the cameras used to shoot the film and has been aggressively promoting the picture. “Valerian” currently has a RT score of 70 percent, with critics praising Besson’s imaginative setting but criticizing the lead performances of Dane DeHaan and Cara Delavingne.

“Valerian” stars DeHaan and Delavingne as a pair of 28th century intergalactic agents tasked with investigating a crisis that is threatening the City of a Thousand Planets, a massive space colony that was once the International Space Station and has since moved out into space and become a cultural exchange for thousands of alien species. Their adventure leads them to uncover a conspiracy that reaches the highest levels of their organization. The film also stars Clive Owen, Sam Spruell, Kris Wu, Ethan Hawke, Herbie Hancock, and Rihanna. Besson wrote and directed the film, as well as co-produced it with his wife, Virginie Besson-Silla.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Dunkirk' Review: Christopher Nolan's WWII Saga Spins a Sensational Story of Struggle and Survival

'Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets' Review: Luc Besson's Loony Space Saga Is Gorgeous Nonsense

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Christopher Nolan's 'Dunkirk' Battles to $5.5 Million at Thursday Box Office

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‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ to Do Battle With ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ at Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/war-for-the-planet-of-the-apes-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/war-for-the-planet-of-the-apes-box-office/#respond Wed, 12 Jul 2017 00:43:17 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1671840 Columbia’s “Spider-Man: Homecoming” dominated the box office last weekend, as all other studios moved out of the way to avoid competing with the webslinger. But after Sony’s biggest opening in a decade with a $117 million start, this weekend will see the Marvel blockbuster go head-to-head with very tough competition in the form of Fox/Chernin Entertainment’s “War for the Planet of the Apes”

Independent trackers have the film making between $58-68 million from 4,061 screens this weekend, with Fox projecting a $55-60 million start. A finish in that range would give “War” an opening higher than the $55 million made in 2011 by the first installment in the “Apes” reboot trilogy, “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” but lower than the $72 million made in 2014 by the sequel, “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.”

It’s still possible that strong word-of-mouth could push “War” above the projection target, as critics have lavished the film with praise since advance screenings began nearly three weeks ago. The film currently has a Rotten Tomatoes rating of 92 percent, the highest for any “Planet of the Apes” film, including the 1968 original.

Should “War for the Planet of the Apes” earn an opening north of $60 million, “Spider-Man: Homecoming” will need a drop-off similar to the 43 percent posted by “Wonder Woman” to keep its hold on the number one spot. Marvel movie history is against that happening, as films with openings close to those of “Homecoming” like “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” ($95 million) and “Iron Man 2” ($128 million) had second weekend drop-offs of 55 and 59 percent, respectively. The other 2017 Marvel release, “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” had a drop-off of 55 percent after its $146.5 million opening for a $65 million second frame in which it faced far weaker competition — “Snatched” and “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” — than what “Homecoming” is facing.

Regardless of the result, comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian believes that it’s good news that the summer box office season finally has two critically praised blockbusters in theaters within a week of each other.

“We need some good news. We need the accolades not only going to the small screen but to the big screen as well, so bring on the two in a row,” he said. “We need that level of quality and competition out there instead of several weeks of new releases underperforming.”

“War for the Planet of the Apes” completes the tale of Caesar (Andy Serkis), the ape that leads his fellow sentient primates into a world where they have replaced humans as the dominant species. Forced to reluctantly lead his people into war against the humans after the events of the last film, the battle hits home for Caesar when his mate and child are killed by a raid led by a rogue colonel (Woody Harrelson). With the help of longtime companions Maurice and Rocket (Karin Konoval and Terry Notary), a hermit chimp named Bad Ape (Steve Zahn), and a mute human war orphan nicknamed Nova (Amiah Miller), Caesar embarks on a quest to defeat the colonel as the conflict between humans and apes reaches its climax.

“War for the Planet of the Apes” is directed by Matt Reeves, who co-wrote the script with Mark Bomback. Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver, who wrote the first two installments of the reboot trilogy, produced the film with Peter Chernin and Dylan Clark.

Also releasing this weekend is Broad Green’s horror film “Wish Upon,” which stars Joey King as a teenager who discovers a box that grants the bearer any wish he or she desires, but at a grisly cost. The film is projected for a $8-10 million opening, with a release on approximately 2,100 screens. John R. Leonetti directed the film from a screenplay by Barbara Marshall, with Sherryl Clark as producer.

Finally, there is Amazon/Lionsgate’s “The Big Sick,” which is getting a wide release on approximately 2,500 screens after a limited run that earned the film $7.1 million from 326 screens. The film stars Kumail Nanjiani as a dramatized version of himself and recounts how he met his wife, Emily (played by Zoey Kazan), with whom he co-wrote the film. Directed by Michael Showalter and produced by Judd Apatow and Barry Mendel, the film was bought by Amazon Studios at Sundance for $12 million, with Lionsgate later joining as co-distributor. It has a 97 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes.

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‘Wonder Woman’ on Brink of Beating ‘Suicide Squad,’ ‘Batman v Superman’ at Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/wonder-woman-suicide-squad-batman-v-superman-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/wonder-woman-suicide-squad-batman-v-superman-box-office/#respond Wed, 28 Jun 2017 18:21:22 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1664933 There’s no Lasso of Truth like box-office numbers: Wonder Woman is about to conquer Batman, Superman, Harley Quinn and all her Suicide Squad comrades.

As it approaches its fifth weekend in theaters, “Wonder Woman” is set to pass its DC Extended Universe predecessors, “Batman v Superman” and “Suicide Squad,” at the domestic box-office with a $325 million total and counting.

After grossing $3.9 million on Tuesday, “Wonder Woman” is less than $6,000 away from passing “Suicide Squad” and its $325.1 million domestic take. If “Wonder Woman” maintains its current pace, it should pass “BvS” and its $330 million total by the end of Thursday.

“Wonder Woman,” which opened June 2, was the third movie in 2017 to score a $100 million-plus opening with a $103.1 million bow. That was significantly less than the $133 million made by “Squad” and $166 million made by “BvS.”

But “Wonder Woman” has staying power. Thanks to better buzz than “BvS” or “Suicide Squad,” “Wonder Woman” has held on to a larger share of its audience from week to week.

While “Squad” and “BvS” received second-weekend totals that were more than 65 percent down from their opening weekends, “Wonder Woman” held its drop-off to just 43 percent and outperformed “BvS” $58.5 million to $51.3 million. This past weekend, “WW” grossed $25 million in its fourth frame, compared to $12 million for “Squad” and just $9 million for “BvS.”

Last week, “Wonder Woman” set a new record for the highest worldwide grossing live-action film directed by a woman. Patty Jenkins’ film, which has a global total of over $660 million, passed Phyllida Lloyd’s “Mamma Mia!,” which made $609.8 million in 2008.

In a sense, Wonder Woman also beat herself: The character also appeared in “BvS.” Judging from her box office, maybe she should have appeared in the movie more.

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Record Wide Opening for ‘Despicable Me 3’ to Kick Off July Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/despicable-me-3-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/despicable-me-3-box-office/#respond Tue, 27 Jun 2017 20:58:59 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1664251 Universal is pulling out all the stops with Illumination’s “Despicable Me 3” this weekend, releasing the film in 4,529 locations. That sets a new record for the widest opening in movie history, beating the 4,468 screens “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” was released on in 2010.

With an 77 percent Rotten Tomatoes score behind it, “Despicable Me 3” is tracking to have far and away the biggest opening for an animated movie so far this year. Universal is pegging the film for an $85 million start, while independent trackers have it making between $90-100 million.

If “Despicable Me 3” can somehow perform above those expectations, it will become the first animated movie with a $100 million-plus opening in nearly a year. The last to cross that mark was another Universal/Illumination title from last July, “The Secret Life of Pets,” which went on to become the highest grossing animated film outside the Disney/Pixar canon with an $875 million global cume.

Even if it doesn’t achieve that distinction, “Despicable Me 3” should carry Universal well into the second half of what has been a very good 2017 for them. Though the studio had a domestic stumble earlier this month with “The Mummy” — the blockbuster has only grossed $68.7 million in the States through three weekends — that film, combined with “The Fate of the Furious,” helped push Universal’s annual overseas gross past the $2 billion mark and past the $3 billion mark globally at a studio-record pace. “DM3” will push the studio’s domestic total past $1 billion this weekend, following a first half of 2017 that, along with “Fate of the Furious,” has been powered by mid-to-low budget hits like “Fifty Shades Darker” and Blumhouse offerings “Split” and “Get Out.”

But before Gru and the Minions invade theaters for a third round, TriStar and MRC will try to cash in on the thirst for original movie counter-programming with a Wednesday release of Edgar Wright’s “Baby Driver.” This film is the biggest wild card of the summer so far, having been moved up from an August release to right in the middle of a blockbuster-heavy mid-summer slate.

Sony/TriStar and MRC will be aiming for audiences looking for a break from franchise titles, with the hopes that the film’s rave reception from its SXSW premiere and its 99 percent RT score can be turned into strong word-of-mouth. Against a $34 million budget, the film is tracking for a $15-20 million five-day opening from 3,200 screens, with Sony expecting a low-teens opening and a strong return from the July 4 holiday.

Finally, there’s New Line/Village Roadshow’s comedy “The House,” which is tracking for $13-16 million from approximately 3,000 screens, with Warner Bros. projecting a $12 million start. The film stars Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler as a couple who start an illegal casino to make back the money they lost when they blew their daughter’s college fund. Andrew Jay Cohen directed the film and co-wrote it with Brendan O’Brien. O’Brien is producing with Ferrell and Adam McKay.

“Despicable Me 3” stars Steve Carell as series protagonist Gru, who, after losing his position in the Anti-Villain League for failing to capture Hollywood star turned villain Balthazar Bratt (Trey Parker), is tempted to return to villainy by his long-lost brother Dru (also voiced by Carell). Kristen Wiig, Jenny Slate, Miranda Cosgrove, and Russell Brand also star. Pierre Coffin and Kyle Balda directed the film from a script by Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio. Janet Healy and Chris Meledandri are producers.

“Baby Driver” stars Ansel Elgort as the titular getaway car driver who listens to music while driving bank thieves from the cops to drown out his tinnitus. After meeting a beautiful waitress named Debora (Lily James), he yearns to escape his life of crime, but his boss (Kevin Spacey) won’t let him go without a fight. Jamie Foxx, Jon Hamm and Eliza Gonzalez also star. The film is written and directed by Edgar Wright, with Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner and Nira Park producing.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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What Franchise Fatigue? Sequels Like ‘Transformers’ Still Rake in Cash Outside US https://www.thewrap.com/what-franchise-fatigue-movie-sequels-still-rake-in-cash-outside-america/ https://www.thewrap.com/what-franchise-fatigue-movie-sequels-still-rake-in-cash-outside-america/#respond Mon, 26 Jun 2017 22:00:41 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1648504 With the domestic summer box office performing much lower than many hoped — including the weakest Memorial Day weekend in 18 years — the phrase “franchise fatigue” has become common once again.

While comic book movies continue to be dependable hits, with “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” and “Wonder Woman” grossing more than $700 million combined, other sequels like “Alien: Covenant,” “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” and last weekend’s “Transformers: The Last Knight” have fallen well below expectations.

However, even as some long-running franchises are finding their domestic numbers plateauing or declining, they have remained extremely profitable hits thanks to continued interest from moviegoers in developing overseas markets. In fact, some recent sequels are now grossing upwards of 75 percent of their total global box office cume from outside the U.S., compared to between 60-70 percent for their predecessors.

“The more films you make in a series, the harder it is to avoid taking a down-tick,” Exhibitor Relations box office analyst Jeff Bock told TheWrap. “The good news for now is that we’ve seen these overseas markets pick up the slack and studios are banking on it.”

The first movie to do this in 2017 was “The Fate of the Furious,” which is the sixth film ever to reach an overseas box office total of $1 billion. With a domestic cume of $225 million, it is by no means a disappointment for Universal, as that North American sum is just $13 million lower than that for “Fast & Furious 6.”

But back in 2015, interest in this franchise spiked after the death of Paul Walker, leading to a $1.5 billion worldwide haul for “Furious 7” with a franchise-high $353 million from the U.S. while overseas totals more than doubled the $550 million for “F&F6.”

While that additional interest has largely subsided in the U.S., Universal has been able to sustain it internationally, particularly in China, where “Fate” passed “Furious 7” to become the highest grossing foreign film in that market.

As a result, roughly 82 percent of the $1.23 billion grossed by “Fate” has come from overseas. It’s a sign that the studio’s decision to transform Vin Diesel’s car franchise from a series about street racing into a globetrotting stuntfest starting with 2011’s “Fast Five” has been a lucrative one, allowing the franchise to find overseas appeal as a broader action series rather than one based in the specifics of car culture.

The addition of action stars like Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham has also kept the franchise fresh for global audiences 16 years and eight movies in.

“Pirates of the Caribbean,” on the other hand, is seeing a noticeable drop in domestic openings with each successive sequel. The Disney film opened to $78 million on Memorial Day weekend, a drop from the $90 million three-day opening for 2011’s “On Stranger Tides” and 44 percent down from the $139.8 million M.D. Weekend opening for “At World’s End” 10 years ago.

The two films since “At World’s End” have seen diminishing returns, with “On Stranger Tides” becoming the first in the franchise to gross under $300 million domestically. “Dead Men,” meanwhile, saw the largest domestic second-frame drop off in “Pirates” history — 65 percent, to an estimated $22 millionm thanks to strong competition from “Wonder Woman.” After a month in theaters, the film has made just $160 million domestically.

Like “On Stranger Tides,” which passed the $1 billion mark thanks to overseas returns to the tune of a franchise-high $804 million, “Dead Men” has earned the bulk of its money overseas. Its global total stands at $679 million, with $519 million (74 percent) coming from international audiences. (The film still has to open in some major markets, including Japan on July 1.)

This past weekend, Paramount’s “Transformers” franchise followed the same trend of domestic disappointment but overseas success.

“The Last Knight” earned $265 million worldwide, but only 26 percent of that came from the U.S., where the film made $69.1 million over five days. It’s the lowest opening for any “Transformers” film.

On the flip side, “The Last Knight” had the highest Chinese opening in franchise history with $123 million. That’s 33 percent higher than the $92 million Chinese haul for the series’ last installment, 2014’s “Age of Extinction.” That film earned 78 percent of its $1.1 billion gross  from outside the U.S.

With “Despicable Me 3” and “Spider-Man: Homecoming” likely to pull family and under-25 audiences in the States away from “Transformers,” the overseas:domestic ratio should widen even further as the film opens in France, India, Spain, Japan, and Latin America in the coming weeks.

So what’s the difference? Bock thinks one factor is the increased investment in overseas movie theaters in recent years, making blockbuster movie-going more available to developing markets. This allowed “Pirates” to capitalize on markets like Russia, where the $63 million gross for “On Stranger Tides” was more than double for that of “At World’s End.”

“China and Europe, for the most part, are still in their infancy in terms of blockbuster viewing,” Bock says. “They’re just getting some of these IMAX screens and it’s a new thing for them.”

IMAX Entertainment CEO Greg Foster said that outside the U.S., the draw of a big Hollywood release still hasn’t faded, thanks in part to social media sustaining word of mouth. He also noted IMAX audiences in several Asian markets tend to skew young, making Hollywood fare an event in much the same way American audiences still turn out for Marvel and “Star Wars” films.

“When you look at Indonesia, India, Taiwan, etc., you see a very young population that has been very exposed to American culture,” Foster says. “It’s a hobby of theirs.”

In the case of “Pirates,” Foster also credited Disney’s international approach to marketing. “Dead Men” became the first Hollywood release to hold its premiere in Shanghai. The cast also promoted the film at Disneyland Paris, as well as fan screenings in Europe, Russia and South America.

“More than any other studio, Disney has done a great job building the trust of moviegoers so every blockbuster they release is seen as an event,” Foster said. As for the future of summer franchises and the recent drop in numbers, Foster remains optimistic.

“If you told someone six months ago that ‘Pirates 5’ was going to make $78 million Memorial Day weekend, they would have said ‘Sold,'” he continued. “The North American box office, while it might not be growing every single weekend, it is still a significant portion of the box office depending on the title.”

“Also, titles that tend to be iconic and translatable are still doing well across the board. For IMAX’s box office for ‘Pirates,’ it was still even: a third from North America, a third from China, and a third from international sans China. That tends to be how our movies perform on average.”

But Bock believes that studios are going to have to make a major decision at some point should some of these franchises continue to drop domestically.

“For all of these studios, the only thing set in stone on their slates for the next five years is sequels,” Bock said. “It still makes sense for studios to produce these films, but in most cases they’re not going to have the public goodwill in their back pocket like they used to.”

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‘Cars 3’ Zooms Toward $60 Million Opening https://www.thewrap.com/cars-3-zooms-19-5-million-saturday-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/cars-3-zooms-19-5-million-saturday-box-office/#respond Sat, 17 Jun 2017 15:28:23 +0000 Matt Pressberg https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1659047 Plenty of families packed in to see “Cars 3” Friday night, as the Disney/Pixar film raced to $19.5 million at 4,256 locations, topping all other newcomers at the start of Father’s Day weekend

Trackers are suggesting opening weekend between $56 million and $66 million, while the first “Cars” opened to $60 million. “Cars 3” has a solid 65 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes.

“Cars 3” follows Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson) in the twilight of his racing career as he is eclipsed by a new generation of racers led by high-tech rookie Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer). After a crash puts his career in doubt, Lightning decides to make a comeback with the help of his racing team’s new trainer, Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo). Brian Fee directed the screenplay by Bob Peterson, Kiel Murray and Mike Rich. Fee, Ben Queen, Eyal Powell and Jonathan E. Stewart are producing.

Lionsgate’s Tupac Shakur biopic “All Eyez On Me” rocked to a solid $12.8 million across 2,471 locations Friday, finishing second to “Cars 3.” The film also brought in $3.1 million in Thursday previews

Trackers had set an opening weekend range of $17-22 million, but based on its strong start, the studio is now projecting a three-day gross topping $30 million. The movie carries an abysmal 24 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, but its A- CinemaScore may have helped it with word-of-mouth business. Also, Shakur remains a popular figure more than 20 years after his death.

Directed by Benny Boom and produced by Lionsgate’s Codeblack Films and Morgan Creek Productions, “All Eyez on Me” stars Demetrius Shipp, Jr. as the famed rapper Shakur and follows his rise to stardom. Jeremy Haft, Eddie Gonzalez and Steven Bagatourian share writing credit, with David Robinson, L.T. Hutton, and James G. Robinson producing.

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Sony and LStar Capital’s bachelorette party comedy “Rough Night” took third place among new wide releases, as the R-rated film picked up $3.4 million in Friday showings at 3,162 locations. The studio is forecasting a $9 million weekend, with “Cars 3” and Warner Bros. DC Comics hit “Wonder Woman” also going after its female target audience.

Lucia Aniello directed “Rough Night,” which stars Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, Jillian Bell, Ilana Glazer, and Zoë Kravitz as five college friends who reunite for a bachelorette party that goes horribly wrong when they accidentally kill a male stripper. Aniello co-wrote the film with Paul W. Downs. Both are producing with Dave Becky and Matt Tolmach.

In its third week, “Wonder Woman” continues to hold strong, flying to $10.9 million at 2,700 locations Friday, making it easily the top holdover. With a sterling 92 percent Rotten Tomatoes score, the superhero film is closing in on $250 million domestically.

Patty Jenkins directed the Warner Bros. tentpole, which stars Israeli actress Gal Gadot as the title character. Chris Pine, Connie Nielsen and Robin Wright also feature in the film. Allan Heinberg, Zack Snyder and Jason Fuchs handled the screenplay.

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Box Office Busts: Memorial Day Weekend Totals Lowest Since 1999 https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-busts-memorial-day-weekend-totals-lowest-since-1999/ https://www.thewrap.com/box-office-busts-memorial-day-weekend-totals-lowest-since-1999/#respond Tue, 30 May 2017 23:47:30 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1647592 Once upon a time, Memorial Day weekend was seen by box office analysts and distribution chiefs as the big kickoff to the summer blockbuster season. After the rise of the Marvel movie juggernaut, that kickoff date was pushed back to the start of May, but Memorial Day was still seen as a major release slot and a big weekend for moviegoers.

But after this year’s new releases, “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” and “Baywatch,” performed below expectations, this year’s box office totals for the four-day weekend have been the lowest since the start of the 21st century. According to numbers from comScore and Box Office Mojo, the 2017 Memorial Day weekend totals only amounted to $180.6 million, down 12 percent from the $205.4 million made last year and 43 percent from the record-setting $314 million made in 2013.

To find a Memorial Day result lower than this, you have to go all the way back to the $142.5 million made in 1999, when studios gave “Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace” a wide berth. “Phantom” was the top film of that weekend in its second frame, grossing $66.9 million over four days. That weekend’s new release, “Notting Hill,” finished a distant second with $27.6 million.

The No. 1 film of the weekend this year, the fifth installment in the “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise made $78.2 million over four days, a step below the $79.8 million of last year’s top film, “X-Men: Apocalypse.” Last year saw a new release, “Alice Through the Looking Glass” take No. 2 with just $33.5 million, but this year’s No. 2 was a fourth-week film: “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” with $27.1 million. “Baywatch” was forced to settle for third with just $23.1 million over four days.

Back in 2013, Memorial Day weekend brought moviegoers out in droves thanks to “Fast & Furious 6” and “The Hangover Part III,” which combined for a four-day opening of $167 million. 2014 failed to match that one-two punch, but still had a big winner with “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” which posted a four-day opening of $110.5 million. But “Pirates” and “Baywatch” were duds with critics and failed to attract audiences, while last week’s No. 1 hit, “Alien: Covenant,” made only $13.1 million, showing a lack of heavy interest in the film outside of the horror franchise’s hardcore fanbase.

The good news is that next year’s Memorial Day might get a major rebound, as it will feature the release of the upcoming Han Solo “Star Wars” anthology film, which Disney has moved out of the December slot it has used to release “Star Wars” films starting with “The Force Awakens” in 2015. As for the rest of this summer, the weak results in May beyond “Guardians of the Galaxy” has put the summer season in a hole, with May totals down 22 percent from last year. Studios will now look to June for a rebound, starting with “Wonder Woman,” which is currently projected by trackers for a $90-95 million opening this weekend.

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‘Alien: Covenant’ to Take Down ‘Guardians’ With Both Sets of Teeth at the Box Office https://www.thewrap.com/alien-covenant-guardians-box-office/ https://www.thewrap.com/alien-covenant-guardians-box-office/#respond Tue, 16 May 2017 22:26:41 +0000 Jeremy Fuster https://www.thewrap.com/?p=1638523 “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” has made easy work of dominating the box office for the past two weeks, but its reign may come to an end at the hands of another, far more vicious space-faring movie franchise: Fox’s “Alien: Covenant,” which is projected by independent trackers to have a solid opening this weekend between $40-45 million from 3,716 locations, with Fox projecting a result on the lower end.

Fox has had a lot of success with R-rated blockbusters over the past couple years, blowing away expectations with “Deadpool” last year with a $760 million haul and then doing it again this past March with “Logan” and its $606 million score. They also launched an original R-rated franchise of their own with “Kingsman: The Secret Service,” which made $414 million worldwide against a $81 million budget and will get a sequel this fall.

But “Alien: Covenant,” with its gory chestbusters and hard R-rated horror scares, doesn’t have the same draw as those comic book icons or the action-comedy allure of “Kingsman,” so a comparison between it and its Fox stable mates wouldn’t completely connect.

Instead, a better measuring stick for “Covenant” would be “Mad Max: Fury Road,” an entry in a beloved cult franchise that has long fallen dormant. Not counting the two non-canon “Alien vs. Predator” films or the 2012 prequel “Prometheus,” which didn’t feature the Aliens until the very last scene in the film, “Covenant” is the first film with the “Alien” name since “Alien: Resurrection” 20 years ago. Also like “Fury Road,” a major element of the film’s marketing has been the presence of the series’ creator in the director’s chair. For “Mad Max,” it was George Miller; for “Alien: Covenant,” it’s Ridley Scott.

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With that comparison in mind, “Covenant” holds up pretty well so far, as “Fury Road” posted a domestic opening of $45 million from this release slot in 2015. On the overseas side, “Covenant” has also kept pace with “Fury Road”‘s pre-domestic release, having rolled out in 34 markets this past weekend. The film made $40 million from those markets, including $18.1 from Korea, France, and the U.K. That’s 4 percent higher than the openings “Fury Road” made from that suite of markets at current exchange rates.

If “Alien: Covenant” can hit its projection target and take No. 1 — which a $40 million opening should do if “Guardians” takes the customary 50 percent drop from its $65.2 million second frame — it would be a big victory for Fox’s marketing team, which has put an extensive campaign behind this movie, most notably a sneak-peek screening and panel at SXSW and an annual “Alien Day” promotion on April 26, a day picked as a reference to the planet LV-426 from the original 1979 movie.

Bridging the gap between “Prometheus” and Ellen Ripley’s encounter with the infamous Xenomorphs, “Alien: Covenant” follows the crew members of the titular spaceship as they travel to a new planet to set up humanity’s first large-scale colony. Along the way, they find a mysterious signal from a planet that turns out to be perfect for human life. But when they land, they discover only two inhabitants: David, the android companion from the Prometheus (Michael Fassbender), and the bloodthirsty extraterrestrials that wiped out all life forms on the planet.

Written by John Logan and Dante Harper, the film also stars Katherine Waterston, Danny McBride, and Billy Crudup. It is produced by Scott, Mark Huffan, Michael Schaefer, David Giler and Walter Hill. Critic response to the film has been generally positive, with the film getting a 75 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Along with “Covenant,” Fox is also releasing something much more family-friendly: “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul.” The fourth film based on Jeff Kinney’s hit children’s book series and the first since 2012, it sees an entirely new cast take over as Greg Heffley (Jason Drucker) convinces his family to go on a road trip for his grandmother’s birthday as part of a scheme to become famous. David Bowers directed as well as co-wrote the script with Kinney and Adam Sztykiel. The film currently has a 14 percent RT rating and is projected for an opening between $10-12 million.

Also out this week is Warner Bros./MGM’s “Everything, Everything,” a romance based on the 2015 bestselling young adult novel by Nicola Yoon. It stars Amandla Stenberg as Maddy, a teen girl who suffers from an autoimmune disease that keeps her confined to her house but is tempted to explore the outside world after falling in love with the boy next door (Nick Robinson). Made on a reported budget of $10 million, the film is projected to make $10-12 million from 2,800 screens. Stella Meghie directed the film from a script by J. Mills Goodloe.

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