Halle Berry, Black Bond Girls ‘Paved the Way,’ ‘Spectre’ Star Naomie Harris Says (Video)

“I really am so proud to be here because there are women that I really respect and admire,” Harris tells reporters at Black Women of Bond Tribute

Last Updated: November 4, 2015 @ 10:09 PM

Four black women who’ve appeared in James Bond films are speaking out about the impact the iconic franchise has had on their careers.

Trina Parks, Gloria Hendry, Halle Berry and current Bond star Naomie Harris joined forces Tuesday night in Los Angeles for the Black Women of Bond Tribute, hosted by Essence Magazine and the African American Film Critics Association.

“I really am so proud to be here because there are women that I really respect and admire and have paved the way for me to become Miss Moneypenny, so I really want to say thank you to them,” Harris told reporters on the red carpet.

Naomie Harris, Halle Berry, and Gloria Hendry attend the Black Women of Bond Tribute at the California African American Museum on November 3, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Rachel Murray/Getty Images for THAurban)

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The British actress appears in both 2012’s “Skyfall” and “Spectre” as Eve Moneypenny, an agent trainee turned executive assistant of Bond’s British secret service boss, M.

Inside the event, Berry also admitted she was grateful to have been a Bond babe.

“To be a part of this legacy is a huge honor, it’s a highlight of my career,” the “Die Another Day” star said.

LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 03: Essence Magazine's Regina Robertson (L)reveals Essence Magazine's latest cover of Bond Actress and honoree Naomie Harris during the Black Women of Bond Tribute at the California African American Museum on November 3, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Rachel Murray/Getty Images for THAurban)

Getty Images

New York native Parks played bad girl Thumper in 1971’s “Diamonds Are Forever.”

“I was the first African-American villain Bond girl, which I did beat up Sean Connery,” 68-year-old Parks said sarcastically.

“Live and Let Die” star Hendry became Bond’s first African-American love interest in the 1973 film. The 66-year-old talked about being disappointed after her love scenes with then-Bond Roger Moore were cut from some versions of the film.

“I was living my life and not recognizing the color factor until after the fact… when they stopped and they took out my kissing role with Roger in various parts of the world,” she said. “And I went, ‘Wow.'”

Before the celebration concluded, Harris unveiled her cover photo for the December issue of Essence.

“Spectre” arrives in theaters on Friday.

Watch the video from the the Black Women of Bond Tribute below.

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