Gregg Allman’s Final Album ‘Poignant, Reflective,’ Says Its Producer (Exclusive)

Rocker, who died Saturday at 69, “was approving mixes right up until the day he passed,” famed producer tells TheWrap

Music legend Gregg Allman, who died on Saturday at age 69, was finalizing his last solo album “up until the day he passed,”  renowned music producer Don Was told TheWrap.

Was, president of Blue Note Records, was finalizing the tracks for the rocker’s next solo album, “Southern Blood,” when he learned of the musician’s death.

“We recorded it in Muscle Shoals a year ago and have been putting the finishing touches on as his health permitted,” Was said, referring to the Alabama town that is home to the legendary Fame recording studio.

“Thankfully, he was able to complete the record and was approving mixes right up until the day he passed,” said the producer. “It’s a very poignant, reflective collection of songs called ‘Southern Blood’ that has been slated for a September release.”

Was went on to pay tribute to his collaborator: “Gregg was an incredible cat: at once, both a
badass bluesman and a sweet, humble gentleman. It was an honor to be part of his final testament.”

Allman “passed away peacefully at his home in Savannah, Georgia,” according to the musician’s website. The organist and singer for The Allman Brothers Band helped create the Southern rock genre.

Allman was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and raised in Florida by a single mother after his father was shot to death. The rocker was known for his long blond hair and songs including “Whipping Post,” ″Ramblin’ Man” and “Midnight Rider.”

Gregg and his late brother, guitarist Duane Allman, founded the legendary Allman Brothers Band and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Gregg Allman was honored with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012.

The Allman Brothers Band first started in 1969 and their seminal live album “At Fillmore East” in 1971 made them household names among rock fans. Duane was killed in a motorcycle accident in 1971 and Gregg was its sole namesake for another 45 years.