Emmy Reactions: Kevin Spacey Says ‘House of Cards’ Proves TV Is Smarter Than Music Industry

Emmy Reactions: Kevin Spacey Says 'House of Cards' Proves TV Is Smarter Than Music Industry

"If you give people what they want, when they want it, in the form they want it in, at a reasonable price, they won't steal it," the actor tells TheWrap

The nine Emmy nominations for Netflix's "House of Cards," including a key nod in the Outstanding Drama Series category, shows that the Television Academy is willing to recognize "a new way of viewing," Kevin Spacey told TheWrap on Thursday morning.

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"For the Academy to recognize us, being the new kids on the block, is fantastic," Spacey said from the Baltimore set of "House of Cards," which is midway through shooting its second season. "I think that because of this, more companies that have been primarily or specifically in the portal business will want to get into the original content business. Because if you're going to compete, that's what you'll have to do."

The Netflix original series, whose first 13 episodes were released simultaneously in February, simply recognizes the new way in which people watch television, Spacey added.

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"The way in which it has been distributed is really in line with the way in which audiences have been discovering their entertainment over the last number of years," he said. "You ask anybody what they did over the weekend, and they say, 'I stayed home and watched two seasons of "Breaking Bad."'

"That's the way audiences have been consuming shows that are very complicated, with multiple storylines. We're now the first original series to be released that way, but it has been going on for quite some time — although it doesn't affect the way we create the series, because the camera doesn't know it's a streaming camera any more than it would know it was a TV camera or a film camera."

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The Emmy success, he said, only adds to what the show has already done in changing the marketplace. "We are giving the audience what they want, which is the freedom to discover it the way they want to discover it. And I think it also in some measure shows that we have learned the lesson that the music industry didn't learn — that if you give people what they want, when they want it, in the form they want it in, at a reasonable price, then they'll buy it and they won't steal it.

"Why is 'Game of Thrones' the single most pirated show in the history of television? Because people can't get it fast enough."