‘A Quiet Place’ Monsters Explained: What Are Their Origins, Abilities and Weaknesses?

Learn all about these sound-sensitive freaks

Quiet Place Monster
"A Quiet Place" (Credit: Paramount)

“A Quiet Place: Day One” is here, giving us a new look at the creatures that tormented the adorable family, led by Emily Blunt and John Krasinski, in “A Quiet Place” and “A Quiet Place Part II.” In this new movie, we are at ground zero for the initial invasion and see what happens to New York City, one of the loudest places on earth, when the creatures, triggered by sound, descend.

But what do we actually know about these creatures? And does “A Quiet Place: Day One,” starring Lupita Nyong’o, offer any answers? Read on to find out. But first a minor spoiler warning should be issued.

Ready?

Where are the monsters from?

The creatures in the “Quiet Place” franchise are definitively aliens. They clearly have a similar physiology and genetic make-up to us, since they can breathe on earth without any problems and can traverse the landscape gamely. But these things are stone-cold killing machines, first and foremost. Scary!

How did they get here?

The theory, floated in the first movie, is that they attached themselves to meteorites and rode the meteorites to earth. They originated on a lightless world, where they developed armor and great strength. These things are definitely more monster-y than your typical spaceship-piloting alien. They don’t use tools or wear clothes. It makes sense that they would just hitch a ride on space rocks and hop off when they landed on Earth.

What do they look like?

The creatures run on all fours, like a dog or a horse, with larger, longer front legs and pronounced claws (all the better to catch a wild meteor — or unfortunately fated human — with). They have a domed, eyeless head that opens up to expose a complex series of sensors that pick up on sound. They have large jaws with rows of sharp teeth. They are, in essence, a walking nightmare.

What are they called?

In “A Quiet Place” lore online they are referred to as Death Angels. But it was recently revealed that on the film set, they’re referred to as Happy, a leftover nickname from visual effects studio Industrial Light & Magic.

What are their abilities?

They have enhanced strength, potentially from the different atmosphere of their home world versus what is available on Earth. They can hear really, really well, to the point that the survivors on Earth have had to create a new way of life based around how quiet they can be. The family in the first two films lived in a quilted world, where sound is dampened at every turn. And in “A Quiet Place: Day One,” New York City is now plunged into a silent existence.

What are their weaknesses?

The density of their bodies means that they can’t swim in water; we actually see one drown in “A Quiet Place: Day One.” This means that, in a post-invasion world, island-based communities are a premium. Also, in “A Quiet Place Part II,” a sonic frequency is introduced that incapacitates the creatures, one that is shared amongst the survivors towards the end of the movie.

Does “A Quiet Place: Day One” give us any new lore?

There isn’t as much new mythology as you’d probably expect in “A Quiet Place: Day One,” but there is one new interesting detail: we see that the aliens plant something on earth. At first you think it’s little monster eggs, but instead they eat the orbs – it looks like it’s an extraterrestrial vegetable that helps them survive. Considering that there are more sequels and spin-offs planned, chances are that we’ll get more from the world of these questions answered in the not-too-distant future.

“A Quiet Place: Day One” is in theaters now.

Comments

One response to “‘A Quiet Place’ Monsters Explained: What Are Their Origins, Abilities and Weaknesses?”

  1. Brad Avatar
    Brad

    So, a planet without a sun? With a whole ecosystem? With creatures that are not only excellent predators, but also the prey of something that required them to develop bulletproof skin. Interesting.

    They are like humans, because they breathe our atmosphere, yet they somehow survived a journey of many light-years on ‘space rocks’ that could only be travelling a few hundred kms and hour at most, so, let’s say maybe a few million years with no oxygen. And they didn’t burn up on re-entry. And they were fully grown and active as soon as they crashed to earth. And all their space rocks landed on Earth on the same day.

    And of course they travelled by space rock because they are too primitive to develop spacecraft. You know how Neanderthal man used to just jump onto rogue asteroids when they wanted to explore space?

    This article may be the only thing dumber than the actual movies.

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