Hugh Grant Receives ‘Substantial’ Settlement in News of the World Hacking Lawsuit

"Four Weddings and a Funeral" actor Hugh Grant will donate his settlement sum to an organization that promotes accountable media

Hugh Grant has settled his legal beef with the former publishers of defunct British tabloid News of the World — and he's walking away from the courtroom drama with a nice chunk of change.

Getty Images"Four Weddings and a Funeral" actor Grant — who was victimized during News of the World's phone-hacking scandal — has reached a settlement with News International, which he filed suit against in September. According to the 52-year-old actor's attorney, Grant will receive a "substantial sum" from News International subsidiary News Group Newspapers.

"Hugh Grant has today settled his claims for damages and other legal remedies arising out of the unlawful activities of News of the World journalists and others over a number of years," Grant's attorney, Mark Thomson, told TheWrap in a statement Friday.

Also read: Hugh Grant Secretly Tapes Conversation With Ex-News of the World Editor About Phone Hacking Scandal

"Hugh Grant has today settled his claims for damages and other legal remedies arising out of the unlawful activities of News of the World journalists and others over a number of years.

"News Group Newspapers have agreed to pay him a substantial sum by way of damages," Thomson added.

Also read; Hugh Grant Rails Against Tabloid Culture Before Parliament

Grant won't be keeping the windfall — he's donating the damages, plus an additional fee out of his own pocket, to the Hacked Off Campaign, which promotes a free and accountable media.

A particularly vocal critic of the British media and the practice of phone hacking, Grant railed against tabloids while testifying before Parliament in November 2011, opining that some regulation might be necessary.

“It is a commonly voiced opinion that you cannot in any way regulate, or improve, or legislate for the worst practices for the worst of journalists in this country without damaging free speech; without muzzling proper journalism and the phrase that is always used is 'don't throw the baby out with the baby,’” Grant testified. “I have always said I don't think it is that difficult to tell what is bath water and what is a baby. To most people it is pretty obvious.”

News of the World closed up operations after 168 years in 2011, after the phone-hacking scandal broke.

Prior to Friday's settlement, News International had already settled with numerous other hacking victims, including actor Jude Law and soccer player Ashley Cole.