David Glasser Steps Down as COO of Weinstein Co. After 7 Years

The veteran executive was Harvey’s right hand, and he was in midst of contract renewal negotiations

Last Updated: July 30, 2015 @ 5:09 PM

David Glasser, chief operating officer and president at The Weinstein Company, is stepping down, the company said on Thursday.

“We were disappointed to hear of David’s decision,” Bob and Harvey Weinstein said in a statement. “He has been one of the best executives we’ve had the privilege of working with and we have had a tremendous run together. David will be missed at TWC but we are in discussions with several high-level executives who we know will continue to grow the successful divisions we built together.”

Glasser’s contract was up and they were in talks for the executive to remain at the company. Negotiations apparently broke down, and it is unclear if Glasser’s decision is irrevocable, as he has been a key element in the company’s success in its new, post-Miramax reincarnation.

He will be at the company through November.

“It has been an incredible run at The Weinstein Company but I have decided to take some time and explore my options in the industry,” Glasser said in a statement. “I will remain with TWC until November where I will work closely with our team to set up the incredible slate for 2015/2016.”

The Weinsteins are known for awards success, and TWC films won two Best Picture Oscars during Glasser’s tenure with the company, taking top honors with “The King’s Speech” in 2010 and “The Artist” in 2011. The Academy nominated David O’Russell’s 2012 film “Silver Linings Playbook” and 2014’s “The Imitation Game” for Best Picture as well.

Other noteworthy releases include Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds” and “Django Unchained,” Woody Allen’s “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” and “The Iron Lady” starring Meryl Streep.

Glasser came to TWC from Syndicate Films International in 2008. He joined as president of international when Glen Basner left to form FilmNation, and became COO/president roughly a year later.

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