Greg Kinnear Joins Lisa Kudrow in Amazon’s Lee Daniels-Whitney Cummings Pilot

“Good People” follows college staffers who navigate PC culture and the #MeToo climate.

Last Updated: May 21, 2019 @ 4:02 PM

Greg Kinnear joined the cast of “Good People,” the Amazon comedy pilot from Lee Daniels and Whitney Cummings.

“Good People” stars Lisa Kudrow and Cummings, who will also direct and co-write. Per Amazon, the half-hour comedy follows three generations of women working in the Ombudsman’s office of a college and navigating “the current cultural climate, the concept of feminism across different generations, and the struggle to reconcile socially constructed ideas with current ethical views regarding complex issues such as sex, race, class and gender.”

Kinnear will play Dr. Paul Keating, described as “the incredibly charismatic and charming philosophy professor at Sacramento University. He’s Indiana Jones meets Joan Didion. He causes problems for Lynn Steele (Kudrow) and Hazel Miller (Cummings) because of his unorthodox methods of teaching and refusal to acquiesce to ‘PC’ rules.”

Kudrow will play Lynn Steele, “The University Ombudsman, a tired, mercurial force of nature who finds herself being seen as out of touch by millennials, even though she has been a champion of women her entire career.”

“Good People” will be executive produced by Kudrow, Cummings and Daniels, who will also direct the pilot and write. It’s produced by Amazon Studios and Fox 21 Television Studios.

Kinnear recently co-starred opposite Isabelle Hubbert and Marisa Tomei in Ira Sachs’ “Frankie,” which premiered this week in Cannes. His upcoming projects include the starring role in his feature directorial debut, “Phil,” which will be released July 5 on VOD film distributor Quiver, as well as “Brian Banks” and “The Red Sea Diving Resort,” coming later this summer. His recent television roles include appearances on “House of Cards” and Jordan Peele’s “Twilight Zone.” He is repped by WME, Anonymous Content and attorney Rick Genow.

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