‘Luke Cage’ Earns Far More Media Mentions Than ‘Westworld,’ ‘Amanda Knox,’ Firm Says

The Netflix show about the Marvel character also received 77.9 percent positive reactions

Netflix’s “Luke Cage” easily outmuscled  “Amanda Knox,” “Westworld” and “Crisis in Six Scenes” combined — at least in social media mentions since Friday, according to Brandwatch.

But the other shows had a big advantage over “Westworld” — they premiered on Friday, while “Westworld” debuted Sunday. Once “Westworld” premiered, it beat “Luke Cage” in mentions.

“Luke Cage” received more than 470,000 mentions on platforms such as Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, blogs and forums. “Westworld” was talked about 73,000 times on social media, while the “Amanda Knox” documentary was mentioned 21,000 times. Woody Allen‘s “Crisis in Six Scenes” received a comparatively minuscule 450 mentions.

Luke Cage Westworld Social Media

According to Brandwatch, which is a social media monitoring and analytics tool, the hashtag #LukeCage was trending the most on Friday, the day of the show’s debut. However, the conversation about “Westworld” surpassed that of “Luke Cage” around 10 p.m. ET on Sunday with nearly 9,000 mentions in the hour. It aired at 9 p.m.

Luke Cage Amanda Knox social media

However, the firm found that “Crisis in Six Scenes,” the Woody Allen Amazon show starring Miley Cyrus, was talked about the most positively, with 84.6 percent of the mentions positive. “Westworld” followed with 82.7 percent positive mentions, and “Luke Cage” 77.9 percent positive reactions. “Amanda Knox” was talked about 67.5 percent negatively. However, the firm added that the negative mentions don’t mean people responded negatively to the documentary itself, but rather were concerned about the subject matter.

The #LukeCage hashtag accumulated more than 1.1. billion impressions, while #Westworld saw 753 million impressions. The firm also looked at the gender breakdown of every show. “Amanda Knox” was mostly talked about by women, while “Westworld” and “Luke Cage” had more mentions by men. “Crisis in Six Seconds” was fairly balanced, with men holding a slight majority of 51.2 percent.