Matt Damon, Jimmy Kimmel Hit Below the Belt in New Couples Therapy Session (Video)

“Jason Bourne” star tries to work out his differences with the ABC late-night host

Last Updated: July 26, 2016 @ 9:16 AM

Matt Damon returned to “Jimmy Kimmel Live” Monday night to try to resolve his long-standing “feud” with the late-night host.

This time, the “Jason Bourne” star and the ABC host sat down with psychotherapist Paul Kundinger — but quickly set up a wall of pillows between themselves on the couch.

Damon confessed to sneaking onto Kimmel’s show the night of the Academy Awards earlier this year — hidden beneath the outfit of his buddy and official show guest Ben Affleck.

“I feel bat-trayed, by Batman,” Kimmel said.

“That was a good one,” Damon conceded.

“He snuck onto the show, even though I told him he was going to be on the next night’s show, he decided I’m going to force my way on this show,” Kimmel complained.

“But that’s what it is, it’s always the next night’s show,” Damon said, summing up Kimmel’s signature sign-off since the start of his show in 2003. “‘You’re going to be on tomorrow, you’re going to be on tomorrow. Oh, no, we ran out of time.’ I’ve never met anyone who’s so horrible with time management.”

While Kimmel conceded his issues with time management, the comedian complained about “The Martian” actor’s proclivity toward “violence” against him. “I was tied up, I was duct-taped on my face,” he said, citing other bits on the show.

“I snapped,” Damon admitted. “I snap sometimes.”

“So I’m supposed to have a snapper around?” Kimmel said.

Kimmel then complained about Damon’s “stupid” ideas to market “Jason Bourne,” including a “Honk if you’re Bourney” bumper sticker.

“Bumper stickers, like this is 1975,” Kimmel scoffed.

The therapist then gave the pair sketch pads to try some art therapy, with Damon drawing Kimmel as an “ass face.”

Kimmel decided to hit below the belt with his own scatological drawing of the actor — forcing both the therapist and Damon to crack up.

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