‘Penny Dreadful’ Sequel Scores Almost $25 Million in Tax Breaks for Shooting in LA

Showtime will film “City of Angels” in the City of Angels

Last Updated: March 11, 2019 @ 6:03 AM

Showtime’s upcoming “Penny Dreadful” sequel will move its production from Ireland to Los Angeles, and bag $24.7 million in tax credits from California as part of the state’s ongoing Film & TV Tax Credit 2.0 program.

The original “Penny Dreadful” was set in Victorian-era London, and filmed in Ireland. The sequel, titled “City of Angels,” will be set in 1938s Los Angeles. The series is the 16th to relocate its production to California as part of the program, and will spend an estimated $99 million on below-the-line wages and other qualified expenditures.

“Choosing where to set up production for the next chapter of the ‘Penny Dreadful’ fable was one of the most important decisions we had to make, and there were many options we looked into,” said Jana Winograde, co-president of entertainment, Showtime Networks Inc. “Shooting in California obviously has many attractions, but without the state’s Film and TV tax credit it could become cost prohibitive. We couldn’t be happier about how things worked out or the benefits it will bring to the job market.”

“City of Angeles” is described by Showtime as a “spiritual descendant” of the original series. When a grisly murder shocks the city, Detective Tiago Vega (Daniel Zovatto) is embroiled in an epic story that reflects the rich history of Los Angeles — from the building of the city’s first freeways and its deep traditions of Mexican-American folklore, to the dangerous espionage actions of the Third Reich and the rise of radio evangelism.

Along with Zovatto, the series stars Nathan Lane, Natalie Dormer, Adriana Barraza, Jessica Garza and Johnathan Nieves.

John Logan, the creator, writer and executive producer of “Penny Dreadful,” will return for “City of Angels.” Michael Aguilar (“Kidding”) will also serve as executive producer. Production on the drama is expected to begin later this year.

“With its established track record and top of the line production value, a relocating series like ‘Penny Dreadful’ brings long-term jobs and significant in-state spending,” California Film Commission executive director Amy Lemisch said. “Global competition and increasing reliance on VFX make it possible for projects set almost anywhere to film wherever they get the best value. We’re delighted that California crews and service providers will benefit directly from this project, which is set in our own backyard.”