‘Incredibly Brave Journalism': Photographers Capture Shocking Assassination Images

“I’m here. Even if I get hit and injured, or killed, I’m a journalist. I have to do my work,” photog tells The Guardian

Last Updated: December 20, 2016 @ 10:09 AM

Russia’s ambassador to Turkey was assassinated Monday by a lone Turkish gunman shouting “God is great!” and “don’t forget Aleppo, don’t forget Syria,” while a pair of brave photojournalists captured the entire incident.

Hakim Kilic is a Turkish photographer for the daily Hurriyet who witnessed the attack and sold his images to Reuters, according to the New York Times.

He told the Times that the crazed gunman fired seven shots, including “four from behind, three while the body was on the ground.”

Kilic said he hid behind a cocktail table about 12 feet away from the killer, whom the photographer says yelled, “Call the police, and I will die here.”

The photos are both terrifying and incredible, capturing a moment that most people only experience in nightmares.

Burhan Ozbilici, a photographer for the Associated Press who also captured the assassination, snapped some amazing-yet-horrifying shots as well.

Ozbilici described what he was thinking during the attack to The Guardian. “I’m here. Even if I get hit and injured, or killed, I’m a journalist. I have to do my work,” he said. “I could run away without making any photos … But I wouldn’t have a proper answer if people later ask me: ‘Why didn’t you take pictures?'”

He continued: “I was, of course, fearful and knew of the danger if the gunman turned toward me. But I advanced a little and photographed the man as he hectored his desperate, captive audience.”

After the ordeal, Ozbilici found himself amazed one more time.

“When I returned to the office to edit my photos, I was shocked to see that the shooter was actually standing behind the ambassador as he spoke. Like a friend, or a bodyguard,” he told The Guardian.

Both photographers have been praised on Twitter for both bravery and reminding us of the importance of journalism.

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