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‘SNL': Bill Hader Is the Canadian Harvey Weinstein and Everyone is Sorry (Video)

The #MeToo movement makes it to Canada on “SNL” and it’s a whole lot more polite and considerate than the American version

Last Updated: March 18, 2018 @ 11:11 AM

The #MeToo movement made it to Canada in an “SNL” sketch that found host Bill Hader as the extremely polite “Canadian Harvey Weinstein.”

Hader plays fictional Canadian movie producer Thomas Logan, responsible for such hits in Canada as “Y’Don’t Say,” “It Happened at Tim Hortons,” and “Dave: The Dave Thomas Story, Starring Dave Foley.”

“Yeah, I’ve heard all these accusations against me, and I’m here to say, it’s all true,” Hader’s Logan says in an interview on CBC News Hour. “Definitely abused my power.”

“Can you tell the folks at home what you did exactly?” Asks Cecily Strong, playing the CBC anchor giving the interview.

“Yeah, you know, I had this assistant, and I was real inappropriate with her, saying stuff like ‘You look nice today,’ or ‘What kind of sunglasses are those.’ Really pestering her. Well, she got ticked, and I just went ahead resigned.”

The CBC report notes that Logan is revealed as a monster “by Canadian standards” — which includes a ton of apologies, and some really polite “harassment.”

Hader’s Logan explains in the interview about how he complimented his assistant, played by Heidi Gardner, on her sweater, before realizing that doing so was “a bit forward,” Gardner says.

“As soon as I realized, I said I was sorry,” Logan explains. “So I go to HR, and I say, ‘Sorry, I gotta say, but I really put my boot in it this time,’ and HR lady says, ‘No, I’m sorry, I should have seen this coming,’ and I resign, and then she resigns.”

“And I resigned too, because I was just so sorry about how it all turned out,” Gardner adds.

The sketch also pulled in the Canadian indie rock band Arcade Fire, which served as musical guest for the episode, as performers who’d worked with Logan. They didn’t really know him, but going with the stereotype of polite Canadians, all apologized for working with him.