Stephen Colbert Questions Hillary Clinton’s Motives in Becoming a Grandmother (Video)

The potential presidential candidate welcomed a granddaughter on Saturday

Hillary Clinton has received several congratulatory messages since the birth of her granddaughter Charlotte on Saturday. But she won’t be getting any from Stephen Colbert.

“Yet another Hillary flip-flop,” Colbert said on his show Monday night. “Four days ago, she wasn’t a grandmother and now she claims she is. How can we trust her?”

See video: Kevin Spacey Punks Hillary Clinton With Bill Clinton Impersonation in ‘House of Cards’ Spoof 

Charlotte Clinton Mezvinsky was born to parents Chelsea Clinton and her husband Marc Mezvinsky. She is the first grandchild for Bill and Hillary Clinton.

In addition to the timing of the new Clinton child, Colbert also took issue with why they decided to name the baby Charlotte.

“Kind of suspicious she was named after the largest city in a major swing state,” said Colbert. “I mean, if it had been a boy, would we be celebrating the birth of little baby Akron?”

See video: Stephen Colbert Accuses NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio of Murdering Charlotte the Groundhog

Hillary has still yet to announce her intention to run for president again after a failed attempt for the White House in 2008. Colbert also discussed the 1971 correspondence Hillary sent to Saul Alinsky, a prominent community organizer, regarding the release of his book, “Rules for Radicals.”

“The most shocking thing about Hillary’s penpal scandal, or Pen-ghazi as I’m calling it, is how few people are shocked by it,” Colbert said.

See video: Michael Che Explores the Sick World of Prescription Drug Cartels for ‘The Daily Show’

But Colbert has an even more shocking letter that could end her presidential campaign before it even begins. The faux-publican has uncovered a message to Santa, written by Hillary in her youth.

“She goes on to collude with this Red coat, known for supporting slave labors and the exclusion of Jews.”

Watch the video above.

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