Stormy Daniels Lawyer Asks to Go on ‘Hannity': ‘We Are Both Street Fighters’

A sit-down with Hannity would give Michael Avenatti access to the largest audience in cable news

Michael Avenatti wants his moment on Fox News.

The Stormy Daniels attorney tweeted at Sean Hannity Monday evening to say he wanted a sit down where he would be given an opportunity to lay his cards on the table for the biggest audience in cable news.

“We don’t agree on everything but we are both street fighters @seanhannity, which means something,” he tweeted. “Let’s set a booking so I can come on the show to talk about the case and the issues in the case. No BS. Just a straight up discussion by two men. Thanks for considering it.”

Hannity and Avenatti were spotted mingling at a recent New York City bash thrown by The Hollywood Reporter, where former Politico Playbook author Alex Weprin reported that they were “deep in conversation”

While he has become a de facto contributor on MSNBC and CNN, Avenatti has rarely popped up on Fox News — a matter he has publicly complained about.

Hannity — and many of his network colleagues — have vociferously complained about the amount of coverage Avenatti and his client Stormy Daniels have received over an affair she says she had with Donald Trump back in 2006. Trump has consistently denied that the tryst ever occurred.

A Hannity interview would be a huge win for Avenatti, allowing him direct access to the Fox News’ biggest star.

The Hannity request came after Avenatti had to cancel a planned interview with Fox News host Martha MacCallum Monday evening over a time conflict. The fiery lawyer slammed Maccallum after he said she mischaracterized the reason for his cancellation to her audience.

“You are classless @marthamaccallum. I agree to go on your show tmrw and then had to cancel due to a commitment with the case that I explained to your producer first thing this AM. You respond by calling me out on your show and deceiving people?! #unprofessional #agenda #basta,” he said.

Ouch.

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