Twitter CEO Dick Costolo ‘Ashamed’ of Company’s Failure to Deal With Trolls

“We suck at dealing with abuse and trolls on the platform,” Twitter chief says in internal meo

Last Updated: February 5, 2015 @ 5:49 AM

In a leaked internal memo Wednesday, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo concedes his company is failing at dealing with trolling tweeters.

“We suck at dealing with abuse and trolls on the platform and we’ve sucked at it for years,” he said in in a memo obtained by The Verge. “It’s no secret and the rest of the world talks about it every day. We lose core user after core user by not addressing simple trolling issues that they face every day.”

Costolo went on to take full ownership of the problem vowing to fix it.

“I’m frankly ashamed of how poorly we’ve dealt with this issue during my tenure as CEO. It’s absurd. There’s no excuse for it. I take full responsibility for not being more aggressive on this front. It’s nobody else’s fault but mine, and it’s embarrassing. We’re going to start kicking these people off right and left and making sure that when they issue their ridiculous attacks, nobody hears them. Everybody on the leadership team knows this is vital.”

He sent follow up messages going even further, apparently responding to questioning staffers: “I take PERSONAL responsibility for our failure to deal with this as a company. I thought i did that in my note, so let me reiterate what I said, which is that I take personal responsibility for this. I specifically said “It’s nobody’s fault but mine.”

The CEO, whose company’s fourth quarter earnings will be released Thursday, concluded that for Twitter to succeed, its staffers have to be honest:

We HAVE to be able to tell each other the truth, and the truth that everybody in the world knows is that we have not effectively dealt with this problem even remotely to the degree we should have by now, and that’s on me and nobody else. So now we’re going to fix it, and I’m going to take full responsibility for making sure that the people working night and day on this have the resources they need to address the issue, that there are clear lines of responsibility and accountability, and that we don’t equivocate in our decisions and choices.