Rachel Dolezal Near Homelessness After Rejecting Porn and Reality TV Offers

White woman who caught heat for identifying as black calls herself a “generic, ambiguous scapegoat” in her upcoming memoir

Rachel Dolezal, the white woman who became infamous for identifying herself as a black woman for decades and running the Spokane, Washington, chapter of the NAACP, is jobless and fears she may soon be homeless.

In an interview with The Guardian about her upcoming memoir “In Full Color: Finding My Place in a Black and White World,” Dolezal says she’s jobless, has only been offered employment in reality television and porn films, feeds her family with food stamps and doesn’t know how she’ll come up with her March rent. She says that although she has applied for more than 100 jobs, no one will hire her even to stock shelves.

“Right now the only place that I feel understood and completely accepted is with my kids and my sister,” she said, claiming she can currently count the number of friends she has left in Spokane on her fingers.

Dolezal’s life began to unravel two years ago when a TV reporter asked her, “Are you African American?” and she turned from the camera and fled. Shortly thereafter, her Caucasian parents came forward with photos of her childhood as a freckle-faced blonde and claims that her roots are German and Czech, with traces of Native American ancestry.

Time has passed but wounds have not healed — she lost her jobs with the NAACP and Eastern Washington University, most of her family and friends are estranged, and the respect she had earned for her civil rights activism turned into disgrace.

“There’s no protected class for me,” she told The Guardian. “I’m this generic, ambiguous scapegoat for white people to call me a race traitor and take out their hostility on. And I’m a target for anger and pain about white people from the black community. It’s like I am the worst of all these worlds.”

Through the tribulation and disgrace, Dolezal still feels no shame.

“No, I don’t,” she replied, when asked if she thinks she had done anything wrong. “I’m not going to stoop and apologize and grovel and feel bad about it. I would just be going back to when I was little, and had to be what everybody else told me I should be — to make them happy.”

In Full Color: Finding My Place in a Black and White World” will be available on March 28.