Shia LaBeouf's Sky-Writing ‘Apology’ to Daniel Clowes Keeps the Attention Rolling, Clears Up Nothing

Shia LaBeouf's Sky-Writing ‘Apology’ to Daniel Clowes Keeps the Attention Rolling, Clears Up Nothing

Is he punking us or isn't he? Either way, if you're reading this, it's working

Shia LaBeouf's latest cryptic burst of apology to Daniel Clowes was a mere 20 characters, and clear as the blue Southern California sky.

But somehow, we still have no idea what he's up to.

LaBeouf tweeted a photo of a sky-writing message he apparently commissioned to appear over Los Angeles on Wednesday, as SoCal celebrated New Year's Day with several high-traffic events around town — including the Rose Bowl.

“I am sorry Daniel Clowes,” was all it read. The tweet was less direct.

So is he really, really sorry, or is he carrying on a petulant campaign of overreacting to overreaction? LaBeouf has been raked over the coals in the media and over Twitter after it was revealed that his short film “HowardCantour.com” was largely lifted from “Justin M. Damiano,” Clowes’ obscure 2007 comic book.

Also read: Shia LaBeouf Apologizes After Short-Film Plagiarism Accusation: ‘I F—ed Up’

In the two weeks since, LaBeouf has fired off several tweets that were purportedly a continuation of his profuse apology — or were they? It turned out that many of his missives were themselves plagiarized, suggesting some kind of bizarre performance art.

So is this an elaborate stunt? In one breath, Shia says it isn't …

… and in the next, the tart tongue returns:

At this point, only Shia knows what Shia is really thinking. While his intentions remain ambiguous, our headache is very, very real.

  • Charlie

    I think it's a pretty simple case of a simple man try to dig his way out of a hole in naive and simple-minded ways, trying to play off his mistakes in ways he imagines will ‘endear’ people to him or at the very least confuse them as to where he actually went wrong or if it's not all intentional.

    I'm sure he'll still have a career as an actor, nothing will change there, but he obviously had dreams of being “Mr Serious Creative Intellectual,” with the comic he did and the films he's directed, and that's now completely over – there's no chance anyone will ever take him seriously as a ‘creator’ now. In terms of his comics, his ‘writing,’ etc, everything from now on will come with the question of whether it's plagiarised or not.

  • BeteNoir

    La Beouf is a c-word (rhymes with “punt”).