Charles Osgood, 5-Time Emmy Winner and ‘CBS Sunday Morning’ Host, Dies at 91

“To say there’s no one like Charles Osgood is an understatement,” longtime executive producer Rand Morrison says

Charles Osgood attends the 41st Annual Daytime Emmy Awards after party at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles
Charles Osgood attends the 41st Annual Daytime Emmy Awards after party at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles (Credit: Angela Weiss/Getty Images)

Charles Osgood, the renowned journalist and longtime “CBS Sunday Morning” host, died Tuesday at age 91.

His death came after battling dementia, his family told CBS in its announcement. He died in his New Jersey home.

A four-time competitive Emmy winner who received his fifth recognition in 2017 for lifetime achievement, Osgood was heralded upon his passing by “CBS Sunday Morning” executive producer Rand Morrison as a one-of-a-kind.

“To say there’s no one like Charles Osgood is an understatement,” Morrison said in a statement via CBS. “He embodied the heart and soul of ‘Sunday Morning.’ His signature bow tie, his poetry … just his presence was special for the audience, and for those of us who worked with him. At the piano, Charlie put our lives to music. Truly, he was one of a kind — in every sense.”

Praised by former “CBS Sunday Morning” anchor Charles Kuralt, whom Osgood succeeded in 1994, as “one of the last great broadcast writers” and was known for his poetic approach to current events, as well as his charming showmanship as a multi-instrumentalist and singer. The beloved journalist was a CBS News stalwart of 45 years before retiring in 2016, anchoring “CBS Sunday Morning” for 22 years and hosting the radio program “The Osgood File.”

While at “CBS Sunday Morning,” Osgood heralded the program’s highest ratings in three decades, according to CBS, and helped lead “Sunday Morning” to three Outstanding Morning Program Emmy Award wins.

“Charles Osgood is one of the legendary journalists who made CBS News what it is today,” CBS News president Ingrid Ciprian-Matthews said. “His commitment to the craft, especially to the art of writing, left an indelible impression on the field. He was a mentor and friend to many. His impact will be felt on CBS News for decades to come.”

He is survived by his wife of 50 years, five children, sister and brother.

“Charlie absolutely loved being part of the ‘Sunday Morning’ community. We’ll miss him terribly, but there is comfort in knowing his life was charmed, in large part thanks to you,” the Osgood family said in a statement to CBS. “From the bottom of our hearts, thank you for welcoming him into your homes on Sundays to share stories, and to highlight the better parts of humanity. He’ll see you on the radio.”

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