Harvey Weinstein Recalls His Former Intern Brad Grey: ‘Honestly, I’m Crushed’

“His genius at picking and identifying talent was unprecedented,” mogul says of the late exec who got his start at Miramax

Last Updated: May 15, 2017 @ 12:35 PM

Harvey Weinstein released a statement following Brad Grey’s death on Sunday.

Grey, who died at the age of 59 after battling cancer, got his start in the industry while studying at the University of Buffalo, where he met Weinstein and was an intern in his concert promotion business. The pair later worked together at Miramax, which Weinstein co-founded.

“His genius at picking and identifying talent was unprecedented,” the co-chairman of The Weinstein Company writes. “His relationships were warm, rich and inventive.”

Weinstein continued, “All I can tell you is that I can’t wait to get on the phone with those of us that loved and worked with him and share Brad stories. We will be laughing for the next month and ten years to follow. Honestly, I’m crushed.”

Harvey’s brother, Bob, also shared his recollections of Grey.

“I knew Brad for over 40 years,” Bob Weinstein wrote in a statement. “He started out as me and my brother’s assistant, and within six months, it was clear that we should be working for him and not the other way around. He was destined for great things in this business, but more importantly on a personal level, I knew him as a family man and nothing was more important to him than that. My condolences to his family, and he will be missed.”

During his time at Paramount, Grey was responsible for developing such hit film franchises as “Transformers,” “Mission: Impossible” and “Paranormal Activity.”

He also produced a number of popular television series, including “The Sopranos,” “Real Time with Bill Maher” and “The Larry Sanders Show.” Grey is a multiple Golden Globe, BAFTA, PGA and Emmy Award winner, in addition to a four-time recipient of the George Foster Peabody Award.

Read Harvey Weinstein’s full statement below.

Brad Grey and David Chase revolutionized television with “The Sopranos,” arguably still the greatest show ever on television.

Brad’s show business career started when he was interning for my concert company. Brad decided on his own initiative one day to pick me up in the airport, in his own car, so I wouldn’t take a cab. The rest was history. His genius at picking and identifying talent was unprecedented. His relationships were warm, rich and inventive. Every once a while we would have a fight, a minute later we would resolve it. The thing that I was always most impressed about was what a great dad Brad was. Sam, his son, worked for me for a couple of years, he was a chip off the old block. I knew the whole family and he knew mine. Brad worked in the first Miramax office with Robert Newman and my mother. Our deepest condolences to Jill, their children, and of course to Cassandra and the baby.

Late last night, Vivo Nevo, who was so close to Brad, called me to tell me the news. I couldn’t sleep knowing he was gone. All I can tell you is that I can’t wait to get on the phone with those of us that loved and worked with him and share Brad stories. We will be laughing for the next month and ten years to follow. Honestly, I’m crushed.