Former NFL Star Michael Vick Joins Fox Sports, Home of the Westminster Dog Show

Retired quarterback and convicted dog abuser will appear on “Fox NFL Kickoff”

Last Updated: August 25, 2017 @ 12:41 PM

Fox Sports has hired former NFL quarterback Michael Vick to be an in-studio football analyst for the upcoming season, an individual with knowledge of the hiring told TheWrap.

Vick will appear on “Fox NFL Kickoff,” which is the lead-in show for “Fox NFL Sunday.” He’ll also make appearances on various FS1 shows.

That cable channel happens to also be the home of the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. In case you’ve forgotten, Vick has a bad history with the canine community after 21 months in federal prison for his role in a dogfighting ring that disrupted his NFL career.

“I’m very excited,” Vick told USA Today Sports, which first reported the news. “Over the last seven or eight months, I’ve done a lot of interviews, and I think I’ve gotten better as I’ve been put in those situations more often. Things really came together (with Fox) over the last couple months. They have shows that I have always watched and admired. My friends and family are thankful and proud of me.”

“He was obviously an outstanding player, but we feel he has an incredibly bright future as an analyst,” John Entz, Fox Sports president of production and executive producer, told the publication. “He has stayed close to the game and has many relationships with today’s current coaches and players. We feel he can bring a truly unique perspective that intrigues and engages our viewers.”

Vick spent this summer as a coaching intern with the Kansas City Chiefs.

As a player, Vick was a game-changing lefty quarterback, who was as much of a threat with his legs as his arm. The former Virginia Tech player’s career was derailed in 2007, when he was pled guilty on federal charges for his role in an interstate dog-fighting ring. He served 21 months in jail.

Vick has since sought help to rehabilitate that behavior, eventually getting the go-ahead to adopt a puppy for his children.