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Mitch McConnell Mocked for Waiting to Recognize Biden As President-Elect Until After Putin Did

After the Senate Majority Leader finally recognized the election results, folks on social media were quick to drag him for his awkward timing

Despite nonstop protest from the Trump administration over the past month, the Electoral College finally voted to elect Joe Biden as the next president of the United States on Monday. And that prompted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to, at long last, admit Biden won the election over Donald Trump.

The only problem? Russian president Vladimir Putin had already officially recognized Biden as the new president-elect. Overnight, the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs said that Putin had relayed his congratulations to Biden for winning.

“In his message, Vladimir Putin wished the president-elect every success and expressed confidence that Russia and the United States, which bear special responsibility for global security and stability, can, despite their differences, effectively contribute to solving many problems and meeting challenges that the world is facing today,” the Russian ministry said in a statement.

Given the suspicions about the 2016 Trump campaign colluding with Russia on some kind of misinformation strategy — plus the resulting investigation by Special Counsel Robert Mueller — once McConnell admitted that Biden won, the joke practically wrote itself. Twitter users wasted no time going after McConnell — who a lot of Very Online folks often refer to as “Moscow Mitch” — for refusing to recognize Biden’s victory over Trump until after Putin did so.

Check out a smattering of those responses below.

 

While the Electoral College has cast its votes for Biden, the election is still technically not over until Congress formally tabulates those votes on Jan. 6. It’s expected that at least some Republicans will use that session to once again attempt to overturn the election.

But it won’t be easy for them. While they can raise objections to the vote in specific states, they would need a majority of both the House of Representatives and the Senate to actually overturn the election — which is not too likely to happen with Democrats in control of the House.