‘SNL': Melania Trump Is Visited by Past First Ladies, Including Natalie Portman’s Jackie Kennedy (Video)

Portman briefly returns to the role she earned an Oscar nomination for last year

Last Updated: February 4, 2018 @ 10:30 AM

Natalie Portman was a major contender for the Best Actress Oscar last year for her performance as Jackie Kennedy in the film “Jackie.” This week on “SNL” she revisited that role in a sketch in which several past First Ladies give Melania Trump (“SNL” cast member Cecily Strong) advice on how to survive her husband’s miserable presidency.

The sketch takes place just before Trump’s State of the Union address this past Tuesday, with Melania still at the White House attempting to come up with an excuse to stay home. She wishes out loud that she could to “talk to someone who’s been through this whole mess before.” Cue Portman’s Jackie Kennedy.

“I’ve come to you in your hour of need, because I know how very trying being the First Lady can be,” Portman says, in her perfect Jackie accent. You can watch the full sketch in the video embedded above.

“All First Ladies have a platform,” Portman’s Jackie continues. “Yours is bullying, mine was little hats. Your approval rating is through the roof.”

“Yes, yes, people like me because they’re like, ‘That lady looks like I feel,” Melania replied.

“You’re not the only First Lady whose husband has had affairs,” Jackie said. “Jack cheated on me with Marilyn Monroe.”

“Oh please, she was in ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.’ Donald’s girl was in ‘Guys Like It Shaved,'” Strong’s Melania said. “Oh, Jackie Os, no First Lady has ever been more humiliated than me.”

And that’s when Kate McKinnon appeared as Hillary Clinton, who described how she survived the ’90s: “Well, you just tell yourself that it’ll all be worth it when you’re president.”

The cavalcade of First Ladies continued with Aidy Bryant as Martha Washington and Leslie Jones as Michelle Obama, who pops in to say: “My arms rule, I love vegetables, and I could be president whenever I want.”

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