Taylor Swift Butt-Grope Lawsuit Moves to Trial

Judge tosses out fired DJ’s slander claims against singer, but decides that a jury should decide the case

Taylor Swift will be making a special appearance in August — in a courtroom.

A legal dispute between the “Shake It Off” singer and a Denver-based DJ has been ordered to trial, after a judge partially denied Swift’s motion for summary judgment, according to court papers obtained by TheWrap.

Swift is being sued by David Mueller, who claims that he was wrongfully fired after groping the singer’s butt during a meet-and-greet at Swift’s concert at Denver’s Pepsi Arena in June 2013. The radio personality, who goes by the professional name “Jackson,” has adamantly denied the accusation, though Swift has testified, “It was not an accident. It was completely intentional, and I have never been so sure of anything in my life.”

Swift subsequently filed a countersuit against Mueller in October 2015.

In an order handed down on Wednesday, U.S. district judge William J. Martinez partially granted and partially denied Swift’s motion for summary judgment, finding that the facts are in dispute to a point that a jury will have to decide the matter.

“Initially, the Court concludes that this dispute is ‘genuine’ as that term is meant under the summary judgment standard, meaning the factual dispute is sufficiently contested that resolving it requires submission to a jury,” Martinez wrote. “The Court need look no further than the respective testimony of Mueller and of Swift to determine that the evidence is sufficiently contradictory that a reasonable jury could decide for either party.”

“Having reviewed these evidentiary materials, the Court finds that the central and genuine dispute remains,” Martinez added.

The good news for Swift? Martinez tossed out Mueller’s slander claims against Swift, finding that they are barred by a one-year statute of limitations.

A nine-day jury trial has been scheduled to begin on August 7.

“As previously ordered, all parties are required to be present for the entirety of the jury trial,” Martinez wrote.

Pamela Chelin contributed to this report.