Here’s How to Stream Super Bowl 50

Good news for cord cutters: This year’s streams of the big game will be the first to ever include the same ultra-hyped commercials

This may be the only time we’ll say this: Good news! Ads!

The Super Bowl has been available to stream live since 2012, but it’s always lacked one of the most entertaining elements of the show: those over-the-top commercials everyone is buzzing about Monday morning. This year marks the first time national digital and broadcast spots were sold together, so streams will have the same national ads that the millions watching offline will see.

(Local broadcast ads will be swapped out for digital ones if you’re streaming, but the big-time commercials will be the same.)

Whether you want to watch on the biggest screen in you house or the smallest one in your pocket, here’s how to catch the Super Bowl — starting at 6:30 p.m. ET/3:30 p.m. PT — if you’re on the go or you’ve already cut the cord.

But be wary, watching on you smartphone will be the trickiest option of all.

Watching through streaming-media boxes:

If you’re hoping for the classic Super Bowl experience on a television, people who have their sets connected to the Internet with a Roku device, an Apple TV, an Xbox One console, Fire TV, Google Chromecast or an Android TV have the simplest set up. CBS will stream the game, including half-time show and pre- and post-game programming free on its CBS Sports app or channel. Make sure to download the app to watch.

Or Chromecast owners can also fling the game from their computers onto the big screen by streaming in a Chrome browser and then mirroring it on their TV. If you’ve never “casted” from a Chrome window before, Google provides instructions to set it up.

Watching on tablets, laptops and desktop computers: 

Perhaps the simplest option available to just about anybody, any laptop, tablet or desktop computer can stream through Tablets can also watch through the CBS Sports app. The app is available for iPad, Android and Windows 10 tablets.

Watching on a mobile phone: 

If you’re a Verizon customer, you’re in luck. The carrier, which the nation’s biggest by number of subscribers, has an exclusive pact with the NFL to stream games to smartphones.

But that means if you subscribe to another cellular provider, you’ll have to opt for a bigger device like a tablet and find a Wi-Fi connection to watch on your gadget.

Verizon customers can stream Super Bowl 50 through the NFL Mobile app from Verizon, available on Windows, Apple and Android smartphones, or through Verizon’s app-based service go90.