Does M Night Shyamalan’s ‘Glass’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Shyamalan’s “Glass” is his first straight-up sequel, so does it tease future low-key superhero stories?

With “Split” back in 2017, M. Night Shyamalan ventured into new territory as a director — he had stealthily made a sequel to his 2000 film “Unbreakable,” which these days is generally regarded as his best movie. Though “Split” was more of a sidequel than true sequel, akin to the Marvel Cinematic Universe with the big reveal coming during the end credits. And now we have “Glass,” a sequel to both “Unbreakable” and “Split” that brings together the considerable talents of James McAvoy, Samual L. Jackson and Bruce Willis.

Shyamalan’s shared universe has finally come together a la the “Avengers” films, and we can’t help but wonder what’s next, if anything, for this surprising little franchise. After all, the pop culture landscape is littered with these types of series at this point — and franchises never truly die. “Avengers: Endgame” might be about to end the story of the first eleven years of the MCU, but we already know the MCU will continue on afterwards. That’s just how these things go.

So you might be wondering, then, if “Glass” follows in the footsteps of “Split” and all those Marvel movies by including some kind of tease for a follow-up movie during or after the end credits. Because surely this series can’t end here, right?

So, does “Glass” have a post-credits scene?

The answer, for better or worse, is no. Once the credits roll at the end of “Glass,” the movie is fully over. Shyamalan is telling press that he has no plans for another one of these movies — with the caveat that he could change his mind any any time. And the movie reflects that idea by not teasing more movies with a post-credits scene, but still leaving the door open for a continuation.

That said, it’s always good to stick around through the credits in appreciation for the many, many people who helped bring whatever you just watched to life. But if you need to get out of the theater quickly for whatever reason after watching “Glass,” you can do so knowing you aren’t missing any extra content after the credits.