Walt Disney Animation’s ‘Moana’ Sets Sail as South Pacific Girl Adventure

The comedy-adventure film from “The Little Mermaid” team will debut in late 2016

Walt Disney Animation unveiled plans for another female-driven film, “Moana,” a CG-animated comedy-adventure from “The Little Mermaid Team” of Ron Clements and John Musker.

The film, which follows a teenage girl’s mission to fulfill her ancestors’ quest, is expected to hit theaters in late 2016. Set in the ancient South Pacific world of Oceania, Moana, a born navigator, searches for a fabled island. Her incredible journey teams with her hero, the legendary demi-god Maui, as they traverse the open ocean on an action-packed voyage, encountering enormous sea creatures, breathtaking underworlds and ancient folklore.

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Both Clements and Musker are Disney veterans and the team behind such hits as “Mermaid,” “Aladdin,” and “The Princess and the Frog.”

“John and I have partnered on so many films,” said Clements. “Creating ‘Moana’ is one of the great thrills of our career. It’s a big adventure set in this beautiful world of Oceania.”

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“Moana is indomitable, passionate and a dreamer with a unique connection to the ocean itself,” Musker said. “She’s the kind of character we all root for, and we can’t wait to introduce her to audiences.”

The studio would love to repeat the success it had with the female-driven “Frozen,” which scored more than a billion dollars in box office worldwide.

The studio may also have a big hit with the upcoming “Big Hero 6,” analysts are expecting a $60 million dollar weekend when it releases on Nov. 7. “Big Hero 6” follows robotics prodigy Hiro Hamada, who with his closest companion — a robot named Baymax – and a reluctant team of first-time crime fighters, battles to save the high-tech city of San Fransokyo.

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