9 Shows Like ‘Bridgerton’ to Watch While You Wait for Season 3 to Return

From spin-off “Queen Charlotte” and “The Gilded Age” to “Mary & George” and “Gossip Girl”

Bridgerton
Luke Newton as Colin Bridgerton, Nicola Coughlan as Penelope Featherington in "Bridgerton." (Netflix)

After waiting years for Penelope Featherington and Colin Bridgerton’s friends-to-lovers arc — and that carriage scene — “Bridgerton” has fans on the edge of their seats until Season 3 Part 2 arrives on June 13.

In the meantime, there’s plenty of romance dramas from the time period to fill the need for on-screen yearning, including “Bridgerton” spin-off series “Queen Charlotte,” which might also serve as a refresher for the existing dynamics between Queen Charlotte, Lady Danbury and Lady Bridgerton before watching Part 2. Or, if you’re looking for something a bit edgier, period dramas filled with biting, dry humor like “The Great” or “Mary & George” might be the pick for you.

Keep on reading to get the lowdown on the nine shows you should watch while waiting for “Bridgerton” Season 3 to return.

“Queen Charlotte”

Netflix

The first and most obvious next choice after leaving off on that post-carriage scene cliffhanger is “Bridgerton” spin-off series “Queen Charlotte,” which gives viewers the backstory into the quick-witted and quick-tempered Queen Charlotte we see played by Golda Rosheuvel in “Bridgerton.” Following a younger version of still headstrong Charlotte (India Ria Amarteifio) as she begins her life with a romantic yet elusive young King George (Corey Mylchreest), “Queen Charlotte” delivers “Bridgerton”-esque moments of yearning — and steaminess — alongside classic “Bridgerton” orchestral covers of contemporary songs from Beyoncé, Alicia Keys and SZA. And tuck away some of Lady Danbury’s plotlines — including her connection to Violet Bridgerton’s family — for when “Bridgerton” Season 3 Part 2 returns. —Loree Seitz

Where to Stream: Netflix

“Belgravia”

Belgravia
Epix

If the pomp and circumstance of “Bridgerton” sparked your attention, you may find much to like in “Belgravia,” a series created by “Downton Abbey” and “The Gilded Age” writer Julian Fellowes that takes place in mid-19th century England. The story follows two families living in Belgravia whose secrets begin to unravel. The show is packed with the rich, character-centric drama for which Fellowes is best known. —Adam Chitwood

Where to Stream: Fubo TV and MGM+

“The Great”

Belinda Bromilow, Elle Fanning and Jane Mahady in “The Great” / Hulu

“The Great” offers something of a twisted alternative to “Bridgerton,” as it’s very loosely based on the rise to power of Catherine the Great in Russia, but it hails from creator Tony McNamara — the writer behind the films “The Favourite” and “Poor Things” — so there’s a wry, mean streak running throughout. Elle Fanning and Nicholas Hoult are dynamite as Catherine and Peter as the series begins with Catherine married off to this stranger who turns out to be quite wicked. But can she warm his ice cold heart? Shenanigans (and an assassination plot) ensue as the story takes place almost entirely within the confines of Catherine’s court. The show ran for three seasons and scored a slew of Emmy nominations —AC

Where to Stream: Hulu

“Mary & George”

Mary-George
Starz

Whereas “Bridgerton” fulfills the dreams of hopeless romantics, “Mary & George” might be the right choice for viewers seeking more staunch British humor and realism of the time period while holding onto those steamy moments. Inspired by the scandalous true story, the Starz drama stars rising star Nicholas Galitzine (“Red, White and Royal Blue,” “The Idea of You”) and Julianne Moore (“May December,” “Still Alice”) as a power-hungry mother and son who seduce and scheme to climb the ranks of the Court of England. After being trapped in an abusive marriage, Moore’s Mary looks to her second son, George, to ensure the family has a lasting and royal legacy and encourages him to become the lover of King James I (Tony Curran) in order to guarantee their spot. —LS

Where to Stream: Starz app

“Outlander”

Outlander teaser trailer with Sam Heughan and Catriona Balfe
Starz

The everlasting love of the “Bridgerton” couples is easily rivaled by that of Jamie (Sam Heughan) and Claire (Caitríona Balfe), who have traversed the globe and time itself to be together. After Claire, a married WWII nurse, visits Scotland on a holiday, she finds herself transported back to 1743, just ahead of the Jacobite rising, where she comes face-to-face with her husband’s relative on the wrong side of history while meeting Jamie, who stands on the opposite side of the conflict. Pulled between both men — and both time periods — Claire finds her way back to Jamie no matter how great the distance that stands between them. With almost a full seven seasons out and an eighth and final season on the way, “Outlander” will keep you more than busy until “Bridgerton” is back.  —LS

Where to Stream: Netflix, Starz app

“The Gilded Age”

Carrie Coon and Morgan Spector in “The Gilded Age” Season 2 (HBO)

“Bridgerton fans are not strangers to the power struggles between those in high society, but “Downton Abbey” creator Julian Fellowes’ latest show takes the action across the pond. “The Gilded Age” follows the war of words between old and new money luminaries in 1880s New York City. The HBO drama stars Carrie Coon, Christine Baranski, Morgan Spector and dozens of other high-caliber performers, who chronicle the lives of both the rich and the working class. It may not be as sexy as “Bridgerton,” but “The Gilded Age” will surely provide an appropriate dose of drama — and killer one-liners — to obsess over. — Jose Alejandro Bastidas

Where to Stream: Max

“Buccaneers” 

Imogen Waterhouse, Christina Hendricks and Simone Kirby in “The Buccaneers” Episode 1 (Apple TV+)

People tune in to “Bridgerton” for the outlandish stories of young love persevering, so we know the antics of “The Buccaneers” will fit right in with fans of the Shondaland drama. Set in the 1870s, the Apple TV+ YA drama follows five ambitious women who come from new money American families. After one of them weds a British lord, the group is invited to London to participate in debutante season. Led by Kristine Forseth, the first season chronicles how cultures clash between the American trailblazers and British society, as burgeoning relationships and secrets turn each of their love stories into an intriguing adventure. — JAB

Where to Stream: Apple TV+.

“Dickinson”

Haleigh Steinfeld in "Dickinson" (Apple TV+)
Haleigh Steinfeld in “Dickinson” (Apple TV+)

As far as period pieces go, Apple TV+’s “Dickinson” is in its own lane. The dramedy from writer Alena Smith follows the life of the legendary American poet, told through a modern lens with contemporary language, music and hyperreal moments that illustrate the vastness of Emily’s genius. Starring Hailee Steinfeld, the series focuses on Emily Dickinson’s relationship with her family and close friends, while exploring themes of gender roles, sexual identity and the political climate during the writer’s life. One of Apple’s first scripted efforts, “Dickinson” is a hidden gem deserving of more attention. — JAB

Where to Stream: Apple TV+.

“Gossip Girl”

Gossip Girl
The CW Network

We know this one’s a stretch, but is Penelope Featherington’s secret identity as gossip columnist Lady Whistledown that much different than the anonymous outsider plaguing the elite teens of New York City in “Gossip Girl” with text blasts exposing their most precious secrets? While the shows take place in vastly different time periods and locations, dating outside one’s class is taken just as seriously in “Bridgerton” as it is in the Upper East Side, and secrets, love triangles, rifts between childhood best friends are ever-present in both circles. Even outside of the ton, there are rules Queen B, otherwise known as Blair Waldorf, insists on being followed to maintain societal order.  —LS

Where to Stream: Max

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.